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That’s the "Scold’s Bridle," a gruesome mask used as punishment for "rude, clamorous woman," who are considered to be spending too much gossiping or quarreling in the Medieval times.

Valhalla pewter Accessories: Viking Axe, Thor's Hammer, North Star, Nordic Crossle, Wolf Hammer, Odin's Mask and other Viking pendants

Shame Mask. Worn as punishment to shame a person convicted of a minor crime. From the Medieval Crime Museum in Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Germany.

Pantheon of Oak- braided beard, irminsul spirals like lotus tree of life and hathor hair upside down, with horns and helmet

mirrorfrom mirror

The truth about Vikings: Not the smelly barbarians of legend but silk-clad, blinged-up culture vultures

Viking men were also heavily tattooed but their most striking and fearsome fashion statement was their gnashers. They would file horizontal lines into the enamel on their front teeth and paint in red resin. Gareth says: “That’s like your punk sticking a safety pin through his nose. It would have been very uncomfortable and it’s quite deliberately saying ‘If I’m prepared to do this to myself, what am I going to do to you?’.”

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy.

A Year And A Dayfrom A Year And A Day

Nine Worlds of Norse Mythology

Yggdrasil ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------(Viking Blog (copy/paste) elDrakkar.blogspot.com)

This pendant is considered to be the oldest known crucifix in Sweden. Grave find, Björkö, Adelsö, Uppland, Sweden. Image: National Museums Scotland - Silver crucifix pendant, late 9th–early 10th century.

Runestone from Gotland showing the Valknot. I want to run my hands over this and I know I could gaze at this for a very long time to take in the details...