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    The Mau Mau Uprising (also known as the Mau Mau Revolt, Mau Mau Rebellion and the Kenya Emergency) was a military conflict that took place in Kenya between 1952 and 1960. It involved a Kikuyu-dominated anti-colonial group called Mau Mau and elements of the British Army, auxiliaries and anti-Mau Mau Kikuyu. The movement was violently repressed and failed to capture widespread public support.

    The Mau Mau Uprising, also known as the Mau Mau Revolt, Mau Mau Rebellion or Kenya Emergency, was a military conflict that took place in Kenya[B] between 1952 and 1960. It involved Kikuyu-dominated groups summarily called Mau Mau and elements of the British Army, the local Kenya Regiment mostly consisting of the British, auxiliaries and anti-Mau Mau Kikuyu. The capture of rebel leader Dedan Kimathi on 21 October 1956 ...

    Mau Mau Rebellion Map | ... mau mau movement effects of mau mau rebellion learners activities

    A Kenyan 'Mau Mau' freedom fighter, Waruhiu Itote, stands in the dock in a British colonial court during the 1950's Mau Mau independence rebellion. It involved a Kikuyu-dominated anti-colonial group called Mau Mau and elements of the British Army, auxiliaries and anti-Mau Mau Kikuyu. The movement was unable to capture widespread public support. The conflict set the stage for Kenyan independence in December 1963.

    Colonial Kenya Observed British Rule, Mau Mau and the Wind of Change

    Fighting the Mau Mau

    Squatters and the Roots of Mau Mau

    Gotthard Heinrici was a general in the German Army during World War II. He was considered in the Wehrmacht as the number one greatest defensive tactician in the German Army. He was one of the few generals to defy Hitler and protected his men and rarely failed to halt the Russian advance despite the odds. Outnumbered more than 20 to 1 outside Berlin, he managed to hold off the Russians for almost a week while inflicting enormous casualties.

    Frederick Courteney Selous (31 Dec. 1851 – 4 Jan. 1917) British explorer, officer, hunter, and conservationist, famous for his exploits in south and east of Africa. His real-life adventures inspired Sir H. Rider Haggard to create the fictional Allan Quatermain character.[1][2] Selous was also a good friend of Theodore Roosevelt, Cecil Rhodes and Frederick Russell Burnham. He was the older brother of ornithologist and writer Edmund Selous.

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    UK Ministry of Food leaflet, 1944

    Diggers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The Troubles - A republican mural in Belfast during the mid-1990s. It bids "safe home" (Slán Abhaile) to British troops. Security normalisation was one of the key points of the Good Friday Agreement.

    A little boy walking to his friends encounters British soldiers around the corner in Belfast, Northern Ireland. 1973

    Robert Gerard "Bobby" Sands (Irish: Roibeárd Gearóid Ó Seachnasaigh; 9 March 1954 – 5 May 1981) was a member of the Provisional Irish Republican Army who died on hunger strike while imprisoned at HM Prison Maze. He was the leader of the 1981 hunger strike in which Irish republican prisoners protested against the removal of Special Category Status. During his strike he was elected to the British Parliament as an Anti H-Block candidate.His death was followed by a new surge of Provisional IRA recruitment and activity. International media coverage brought attention to the hunger strikers, and the republican movement in general, attracting both praise and criticism.

    Guy Mollet-British Government cabinet papers from September 1956, during Eden's term as Prime Minister, have shown that French Prime Minister Guy Mollet approached the British Government suggesting the idea of an economic and political union between France and Great Britain. This was a similar offer, in reverse, to that made by Churchill (drawing on a plan devised by Leo Amery) in June 1940.

    Vietnam, 1971

    A scold's bridle is a British invention, possibly originating in Scotland, used between the 16th and 19th Century. It was a device used to control, humiliate and punish gossiping, troublesome women by effectively gagging them. The scold's bridle was also known as the 'gossiping bridle' and was commonly used by husbands on their nagging or swearing wives. The device was occasionally used on men; however, it was primarily used on women who agitated the male-dominated society of the era.

    First successful British H-bomb test – Operation Grapple X Round C1, which took place over Kiritimati

    Child Slave ‘Cartes de Visites’, 1863 Slave children, freed and brought North by abolitionists to emphasize the plight of slaves. The proceeds from sale of the photographs were to be used to educate freed slaves who had come under the jurisdiction of the Union Army in the New Orleans area. A caption on one of these photographs points out that the children had been turned out of a hotel in Philadelphia because of their “color.”’

    The Romanovs