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Teachers Pay Teachersfrom Teachers Pay Teachers

Cause and Effect Jar for Workstations and Centers

A cause and effect activity.

Fantastic Fun & Learningfrom Fantastic Fun & Learning

Jack and the Beanstalk Reading Activities

Jack and the Beanstalk Activities

The Fly's Eyes - Compound Eyes Bubble Wrap Activity Sheet from www.daniellesplace.com

Teachers Pay Teachersfrom Teachers Pay Teachers

Poetry

This huge bundle contains over 270 pages of creative and engaging poetry resources that will save you hours and hours of prep time! It has everything you need to teach middle/high students how to read, understand, analyze, and write poetry.

Fantastic Fun & Learningfrom Fantastic Fun & Learning

Activities to go with Books by Laura Numeroff

Activities to go with books by Laura Numeroff...ideas for the If You Give Give series

Teachers Pay Teachersfrom Teachers Pay Teachers

Back-to-School "Get To Know You" Activities: Fun & Fresh

7 fun and fresh get-to-know-you activities for the beginning of the year, including a “Who Am I?” poster with flip-flap clues, “A Maze of New Friends” activity, and more! Perfect for back-to-school! Gr. 3-5 ($). Click the image for details, or see the bundle of BOTH my Get-to-Know-You activity packs here: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/BUNDLE-Back-to-School-Get-To-Know-You-Activities-Fun-Fresh-2-Packs-1984515

Fantastic Fun & Learningfrom Fantastic Fun & Learning

Favorite Folk Tale Activities

35 Favorite Folk Tale Activities...activities to go with books by Paul Galdone

Elephant and Piggie Balloons - Must do this. Immediately so that going back to work after the tech conference and my little outing (and the food poisoning) is not so ... :X

Teachers Pay Teachersfrom Teachers Pay Teachers

Crime Scene Activity: Analyzing Primary and Secondary Source Evidence

“The Case of the Student Teacher Gone Missing” is a customizable activity that asks students to solve a crime based on their analysis of evidence. First students must classify the twelve pieces of evidence as primary or secondary source evidence. Then students must decide which type of evidence they will use: primary or secondary, and explain why. Finally, students will analyze each piece of relevant evidence to draw conclusion about who the guilty teacher might be.