The Centralia Massacre was an incident during the American Civil War in which twenty-four unarmed Union soldiers were captured and executed at Centralia, Missouri on September 27, 1864 by the pro-Confederate guerrilla leader William T. Anderson. Future outlaw Jesse James was among the guerrillas. In the ensuing Battle of Centralia, a large detachment of Union mounted infantry attempted to intercept Anderson, but nearly all of them were killed in combat.

Union Private John Jefferson Williams was killed May 13th 1865; he is thought to be last soldier killed in the Civil War.

Confederate General Robert E. Lee at his ancestral home in Arlington (now the National Cemetery) less than a week after surrendering.

Sgt. William H. Carney won the Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery during the Civil War on July 18, 1863 (the first Black soldier to receive the coveted award). Sargent Carney, a member of the 54th Massachusetts Colored infantry was wounded twice during the charge on Fort Wagner, S.C. while rescuing the Union Flag.

This is thought to be the only known photo of an African-American Union soldier with his family.

William T. “Bloody Bill” Anderson (1838 – 1864) was a notorious Confederate guerrilla leader with whom Jesse James associated for a brief period during the Civil War.

Southern Leaders in the American Civil War.

Andersonville Prisoners - More than 13,000 Union prisoners of war died at Andersonville prison during the Civil War. Although probably the most notorious, Andersonville was certainly not the only Civil War prison.

Parents of Frank and Jesse James

John Jarrette was a member of William Clarke Quantrill’s Guerrillas. He Rode with Quantrill during the raid on Lawrence, Kansas in 1863, and with Bloody Bill Anderson during the massacre at Centralia, Missouri 1864. After the war, Jarrette joined the Jesse James gang, and was a suspect in the robbery of the bank in Kentucky in 1868. In the photo he wears a captured Union waist belt plate.

German soldier being shot by his own comrades after court martial.

Frank and Jesse James in 1872. The James brothers were Confederate guerrillas in Missouri during the Civil War. #civilwar

William "Bloody Bill" Anderson's body photographed and on display for public viewing hours after his death in Richmond, Missouri by Colonel Cox and his Union forces. Anderson, noted Southern Guerrilla leader often riding with Quantrill, his body was found with a string that had 53 knots - symbolizing each person he had killed.

American Civil War flag This flag is a true veteran of the Battle of Gettysburg. It was captured by Union troops on July 3 during "Pickett's Charge". Today it resides in the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia. (photo courtesy of Museum of the Confederacy)

Striking portrait of Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart one of the Confederate's most celebrated officers.

Jesse James Mid Twenties

Confederate First Sergeant... Union cavalry surrounded a lone Confederate soldier who had no horse and whose clothes were dirty and tattered. A Union officer said to him that it was obvious that he had no wealth and not the means to own slaves. The officer asked: “Why are you fighting this war?” The Confederate answered: “Because you are here.”

Albert Woolson, union drummer boy died in 1956 at 108 yrs. He was the last Civil War veteran.

Confederate and Union soldiers shake hands across the wall at the 1938 reunion for the Veterans of the Battle of Gettysburg.

Battle of Gettsburg veterans. The picture was taken in 1913, at a reunion held on the battlefield. The man sitting on the rocks is a Confederate soldier, and the man standing is a Union soldier.

Civil war soldier at 11 years of age.