The Centralia Massacre was an incident during the American Civil War in which twenty-four unarmed Union soldiers were captured and executed at Centralia, Missouri on September 27, 1864 by the pro-Confederate guerrilla leader William T. Anderson. Future outlaw Jesse James was among the guerrillas. In the ensuing Battle of Centralia, a large detachment of Union mounted infantry attempted to intercept Anderson, but nearly all of them were killed in combat.

William T. "Bloody Bill" Anderson (1839 – 1864) was one of the deadliest and most brutal pro-Confederate guerrilla leaders in the American Civil War. Anderson led a band that targeted Union loyalists and Federal soldiers in Missouri and Kansas. In this badly preserved photo, Anderson lies dead after shooting it out with a Union Army detachment lead by Lt Col Samuel P. Cox near Richmond, Missouri. Historian James Reid posits that Anderson suffered from sadistic personality disorder.

Union Army soldiers, c. 1864

John Jarrette was a member of William Clarke Quantrill’s Guerrillas. He Rode with Quantrill during the raid on Lawrence, Kansas in 1863, and with Bloody Bill Anderson during the massacre at Centralia, Missouri 1864. After the war, Jarrette joined the Jesse James gang, and was a suspect in the robbery of the bank in Kentucky in 1868. In the photo he wears a captured Union waistbelt plate in the photo.

William T. “Bloody Bill” Anderson (1838 – 1864) was a notorious Confederate guerrilla leader with whom Jesse James associated for a brief period during the Civil War.

Union family

American Civil War - Union Infantry Uniform

Portrait of Black Union Soldier 1864

Massacre at Centralia Missouri Bloody Bill Anderson 1864 U s Civil War Card

Cool Union/Confederate soldier poster

Union Soldier

Union soldiers pose on top of Lookout Mountain, c. 1864.

Union Soldier ca 1861, photographed in NY

Youthful Union Soldier Wearing a Checked Shirt

Civil War Union officer, his wife & dog. American Civil War

Union generals of the American Civil War

American Civil War.

Union poster, 1863: Men of Color - To Arms! (The Emancipation Proclamation authorized the enrollment of black troops. Altogether, 186,000 black soldiers served in the Union army and another 29,000 served in the navy, accounting for nearly ten percent of all Union forces and 68,178 of the Union dead or missing. Twenty-four African Americans received the Congressional Medal of Honor for extraordinary bravery in battle) #CivilWar

Archie Clement (January 1, 1846 – December 13, 1866), a.k.a. "Little Arch", was a pro-Confederate guerrilla leader in the American Civil War, known for his brutality towards Union soldiers and pro-Union civilians in Missouri.

Charles Sumner statue in Harvard Square. "Charles Sumner (1811–1874) was an American politician and statesman from Massachusetts. An academic lawyer and a powerful orator, Sumner was the leader of the antislavery forces in Massachusetts and a leader of the Radical Republicans in the United States Senate during the American Civil War and Reconstruction."