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  • National Cryptologic Museum Foundation

    12 Sept 1946: Elizebeth Friedman departs the U.S. Coast Guard. While working with the Coast Guard, Elizebeth and her husband, William Friedman, helped to create the Coast Guard's first official code book. While working for the Coast Guard during the Prohibition era, she decoded over 12,000 rum-runners’ messages. In 1933 her efforts resulted in convictions against thirty-five bootlegging ringleaders found to have violated the Volstead Act.

  • Linda Falotico

    Indiana-born Elizebeth Friedman introduced her husband, renowned codebreaker William F. Friedman, to the field of cryptology--a passion they...

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