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Elizebeth Smith Friedman was a cryptanalyst and author, and a pioneer in U.S. cryptography. She has been dubbed "America's first female cryptanalyst". Although she is often referred to as the wife of William F. Friedman, a notable cryptographer credited with numerous contributions to cryptology, she enjoyed many successes in her own right, and it was Elizebeth who first introduced her husband to the field.

Amalie Emmy Noether (23 March 1882 – 14 April 1935), was an influential German mathematician known for her groundbreaking contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. Described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl, Norbert Wiener and others as the most important woman in the history of mathematics, she revolutionized the theories of rings, fields, and algebras. Her theorem explains the fundamental connection between symmetry and conservation laws.

Vera (Cooper) Rubin | 1928- | Astronomer who pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. She uncovered the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves. This phenomenon became known as the galaxy rotation problem.

Ciallagalena Cobb Williams, circa 1915 "Discover the true story and history of Treme, New Orleans as seen on HBO. Featuring local musicians, artists, dancers, and writers. FAUBOURG TREME: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans retraces the fascinating and unique history of America’s oldest black neighborhood."

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin British astronomer, astrophysicist, author and female scientific role model who, in her 1925 Ph.D. thesis, proposed a radical explanation for the composition of stars in terms of the relative abundances of hydrogen and helium. Her male colleagues at Harvard College Observatory, pressured her to make a less definitive statement, then subsequently published it themselves. She is often not credited at all with the finding.

Tererai Trent, PhD, is a Zimbabwean-American woman who was not allowed to go to school as a child because she was female. Tererai was forced to marry at age 11. By age 18, she was the mother of three. "When my husband realized that I wanted to have an education, he would beat me." In 2009, happily remarried Trent earned her doctorate; her thesis looked at HIV/AIDS prevention programs for women and girls in sub-Saharan Africa.

arianna huffington, age 24: the photo is a scan from viva magazine, 8.1974, in which she was interviewed about her views on "the women's lib movement." She'd recently published a book, The Female Woman, which the magazine described as follows: "Her concept of the 'female woman' is of a person who combines feminity, intelligence, and independence, but without friction and without self-consciousness..."