Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

THIS. IS. BEAUTIFUL. Take a few minutes and watch this. You will be grateful you did.

Simon Sinek presents a simple but powerful model for how leaders inspire action, starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?" His examples include Apple, Martin Luther King, and the Wright brothers.

Glamourfrom Glamour

The Top 10 TED Talks Every Woman Should See. (Seriously, They're Amazing.)

The Top 10 TED Talks Every Woman Should See

A great talk delivered with real pathos. Brené Brown: The power of vulnerability | Video on TED.com

MOVING ART - GRATITUDE A Moving Art original short. This inspirational video was well responded at TED conferences and filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg motivates those around him as happiness is revealed. Music is by Gary Malkin and narration is from Brother David Steindl-Rast.

The Psychology TED talks playlist consists of over 10 hours worth of brilliant psychology related videos. You can access the playlist via the following link. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFDE868BCF58A3950 #psychology #TED

Sarah Kay: If I should have a daughter ... "If I should have a daughter, instead of Mom, she's gonna call me Point B ... " began spoken word poet Sarah Kay, in a talk that inspired two standing ovations at TED2011. She tells the story of her metamorphosis -- from a wide-eyed teenager soaking in verse at New York's Bowery Poetry Club to a teacher connecting kids with the power of self-expression through Project V.O.I.C.E. -- and gives two breathtaking performances of "B" and "Hiroshima."

David Steindl-Rast: Want to be happy? Be grateful | via ted: The one thing all humans have in common is that each of us wants to be happy, says Brother David Steindl-Rast, a monk and interfaith scholar. And happiness, he suggests, is born from gratitude. An inspiring lesson in slowing down, looking where you’re going, and above all, being grateful. #Happiness #David_Steindl_Rast

Guy Winch ted talk on practicing emotional first aid We'll go to the doctor when we feel flu-ish or a nagging pain. So why don’t we see a health professional when we feel emotional pain: guilt, loss, loneliness? Too many of us deal with common psychological-health issues on our own, says Guy Winch. But we don’t have to. He makes a compelling case to practice emotional hygiene — taking care of our emotions, our minds, with the same diligence we take care of our bodies.