Discover and save creative ideas

    Camicia, close-up, mid-16.th century, Tuscany (?) (Museo del tessuto, Prato) double running stitch, pleatwork, long armed cross stitch, and lace.

    3y

    4 comments

    • Carola

      Antique embroidered shirt, close-up, mid-16:th century. Double running stitch, pleatwork, long armed cross stitch, and lace. (Museo del tessuto, Prato)

    • David Coffin

      Camicia, i.e, shirt, close-up, mid-16.th century, Tuscany (Museo del tessuto, Prato) double running stitch, pleatwork, long armed cross stitch, and lace.

    • Wendy Walecka

      Redwork! Camicia: double running stitch, pleatwork, long armed cross stitch, and lace, lovely

    • Jennie Whyburn

      Coloured embroidery on chemise

    People also love

    stitches

    beautiful stitch work

    Tutorial

    Russian Dress. I'd like to wear stuff like this all winter long. The headress would be worn for special occasions.

    bunads skjorte - Norwegian "bunad" shirt with fine cross stitch detail.

    Feather Stitches & Couching.

    Ruff with Needle-Lace Edging, Italian, Early 1600s.

    Also called brodoni. They were large, decorative puffs in the upper part of the sleeve (Landini 2005: 249). The wide sleeves of the 1510's started to narrow in the bottom and become wider at the top. In the 1530's they became gathered, and eventually also smaller, ending in decorative shoulder rolls in the 1550's. This fashion stayed until the end of the century.

    There are few things good friends do more often than relax over a cup of coffee or tea. It's a ritual that brings relaxation and good conversation...

    Coif Date: 1575-1600 Culture: English Medium: Linen embroidered with linen and metal thread, spangles; drawn thread work, satin, chain, and needle-lace stitches

    simple running stitch... big impact...

    Detail of embroidery on the Italian chemise (15th century). From the book Old Italian Lace, Ricci

    Lovely Stitch Sampler

    *Ukrainian embroidery

    Anglo-Scandinavian Staeppescoh or Slipper "Type 1" (10th-11th Centuries) The typology is based on that used by Carlisle, although any errors in the interpretation here are likely to be mine. This one-piece-shoe from Jorvik generally resembles to the Lembecksburg Fohr Slipper. This is a turnshoe. There is no upper binding stitch, except perhaps at the instep. Sewing is most generally done with a 1 mm, or so, "thread" of leather lacing.

    14th century banner with the arms of the dukes of Savoy with the family arms of de Blonays, in a combination of appliqué and embroidery

    Extant; redwork(?)

    Early medieval Irish/ Scandinavian hood. 3 rectangles - A long one from shoulder to shoulder and a square in the front and back.

    women's camicia, probably from Venice c 1575+

    Museo del tessuto