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    Rock-a-Bye, Baby. The American roots of this odd rhyme come from a young pilgrim who saw Native American mothers hanging cradles in trees. When the wind blew, the cradles would rock and the babies in them would sleep.

    2y

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    • Random Interests Boards

      Rock-a-bye Baby, In the tree top. When the wind blows, The cradle will rock. When the bough breaks, The cradle will fall, And down will come baby, Cradle and al The American roots of this odd rhyme come from a young pilgrim who saw Native American mothers hanging cradles in trees. When the wind blew, the cradles would rock and the babies in them would sleep.

    • jenny Siggers

      How soothing is this morbid thinking "Rock-a-bye baby, in the treetop When the wind blows, the cradle will rock. When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall And down will come baby, cradle and all."

    • Story Time

      Nursery Rhymes online

    • Sheverne Love

      Rock-a-bye Baby

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