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Bessie Coleman, the first black woman in history to hold an international pilot's license.

Elizabeth "Bessie" Coleman (January 1892 – April was an American civil aviator. She was the first female pilot of African American and the first person of African American descent to hold an international pilot license

Bessie Coleman, daughter of a poor, southern, African American family, became one of the most famous women and African Americans in aviation history. "Brave Bessie" or "Queen Bess," as she became known, faced the double difficulties of racial and gender discrimination in early 20th-century America but overcame such challenges to become the first African American woman to earn a pilot’s license.

Bessie Coleman aka "Brave Bessie" or "Queen Bess”

Bessie Coleman, the daughter of a poor, southern, African American family, became one of the most famous women and African Americans in aviation history. She was the first woman to earn a pilots license.

Emily Jazmin Tatum Perez, 1st Black Female Cadet Command Sergeant Major in the history of the prestigious United States Military Academy at West Point. 2nd Lt  Perez was killed by an IED while serving in Iraq.  She received a Bronze Star and Purple Heart Medals and is buried at West Pointe Cemetery.  True Hero

Emily Perez, was the first female African American Cadet Command Sergeant Major in the history of the U. Military Academy at West Point. She was deployed to Iraq in December as a Medical Service Corps officer and killed when a makeshift bomb exploded ne

Matice Wright, the Navy’s first black female naval flight officer.

10 Lesser-Known People Who Were The First To Accomplish Things

I am at once a physician, a citizen and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow this concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged and the planned have the right to live. - Dr. Mildred Jefferson (1926-2010) The first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School

Dr Mildred Jefferson The first black privileged and the planned have the right to live to graduate from Harvard Medical School

Nannie Helen Burroughs, (1879-1961) -  Influential African American educator, orator, religious leader and businesswoman who gained national recognition at the National Baptist Convention in 1900 with her speech "How the Sisters Are Hindered from Helping."

Nannie Helen Burroughs (born May was an African American educator, orator, religious leader, and businesswoman. She gained national recognition for her 1900 speech She founded the National Training School for Women and Girls in Washington, DC in

Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson became the first woman to earn a license to practice medicine in Alabama.

What contributions did Georgia Douglas Johnson make to the Harlem Renaissance?

Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson, Alabama’s first female physician. Halle was a 24 year old widow raising a daughter when she decided to attend the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. She graduated.

Mary Fields, nickname Stagecoach Mary, was a former slave who became the first African-American woman to work for the US postal service when, about age 60, she was the fastest applicant to hitch up a team of 6 horses in the Montana Territory. She wore a pistol under her apron and when the snow was too deep for the horses she would carry the mail on her back and deliver it on snowshoes. She never missed a day. When the town of Cascade banned women from saloons, the mayor granted her an…

Mary Fields, c. Mary Fields, also known as Stagecoach Mary (c. was the first African-American woman employed as a mail carrier in the United and just the second American woman to work for the United States Postal Service.

Angela Davis and Toni Morrison

Writers Angela Davis and Toni Morrison. Wallpaper and background photos of Angela Davis and Toni Morrison for fans of Feminism images.

Inspiring

Elizabeth Ann Grier, the first African-American woman licensed to practice medicine in Georgia. She was an emancipated slave who alternated every year of her medical education with a year of picking cotton in order to pay for her training.

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