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Fort Shantok  From 1636 to 1682, this was the site of the main Mohegan town and the home of Uncas, the most prominent and influential Mohegan leader and statesman of his era. Uncas was first noted in European records as the leader of a small Indian community at "Munhicke" in 1636; within a few years of this, Uncas had emerged as the most prominent Indian client of the Connecticut authorities at New Haven and Hartford.  http://tps.cr.nps.gov/nhl/detail.cfm?ResourceId=1958&ResourceType=Site

Fort Shantok From 1636 to 1682, this was the site of the main Mohegan town and the home of Uncas, the most prominent and influential Mohegan leader and statesman of his era. Uncas was first noted in European records as the leader of a small Indian community at "Munhicke" in 1636; within a few years of this, Uncas had emerged as the most prominent Indian client of the Connecticut authorities at New Haven and Hartford. http://tps.cr.nps.gov/nhl/detail.cfm?ResourceId=1958&ResourceType=Site

Fort Shantok, in Montville, Connecticut, was the site of the principal Mohegan settlement between 1636 to 1682 and the sacred ground of Uncas, one the most prominent and influential Mohegan leader and statesman of his era.[2] Originally part of Mohegan reservation lands, the property was taken by the state of Connecticut in the 20th century and Fort Shantok State Park was established. In 1995, following legal action by the tribe to recover its lands, the state returned the park to Mohegan…

Fort Shantok, in Montville, Connecticut, was the site of the principal Mohegan settlement between 1636 to 1682 and the sacred ground of Uncas, one the most prominent and influential Mohegan leader and statesman of his era.[2] Originally part of Mohegan reservation lands, the property was taken by the state of Connecticut in the 20th century and Fort Shantok State Park was established. In 1995, following legal action by the tribe to recover its lands, the state returned the park to Mohegan…

Cochegan Rock = This great natural curiosity, is a huge mass of crystalline granite situated in the town of Montville, CT, on the farm of Mr. Newell Johnson. The dimensions of the rock, as given by him, are as follows: northwest side, forty-six feet; northeast, fifty-eight; southeast, forty-five; southwest, seventy. Max height, approximately, sixty feet; approximate cubic contents, 70 thousand cubic feet; approximate weight, about 6000 tons. It derives its name from a Mohegan Indian.

Cochegan Rock = This great natural curiosity, is a huge mass of crystalline granite situated in the town of Montville, CT, on the farm of Mr. Newell Johnson. The dimensions of the rock, as given by him, are as follows: northwest side, forty-six feet; northeast, fifty-eight; southeast, forty-five; southwest, seventy. Max height, approximately, sixty feet; approximate cubic contents, 70 thousand cubic feet; approximate weight, about 6000 tons. It derives its name from a Mohegan Indian.

William F. Cody and Show Indians Laying a Wreath at the Uncas Memorial in Norwich, Connecticut

William F. Cody and Show Indians Laying a Wreath at the Uncas Memorial in Norwich, Connecticut

Plan of the Pequot Country and testimony of Uncas, Casasinomon, and Wesawegun, 1662 – University of Connecticut Libraries, Map and Geographic Information Center (MAGIC) - See more at: http://connecticuthistory.org/exploring-early-connecticut-mapmaking/#sthash.Ay0isZwD.dpuf

Plan of the Pequot Country and testimony of Uncas, Casasinomon, and Wesawegun, 1662 – University of Connecticut Libraries, Map and Geographic Information Center (MAGIC) - See more at: http://connecticuthistory.org/exploring-early-connecticut-mapmaking/#sthash.Ay0isZwD.dpuf

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