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The color of the skin makes no difference. What is good and just for one is good and just for the other, and the Great Spirit made all men brothers. I have a red skin, but my grandfather was a white man. What does it matter? It is not the color of my skin that makes me good or bad. ~~Chief WHITE SHIELD~~

“They made us many promises, more than I can remember, but they kept only one; they promised to take our land, and they did.” Chief Red Cloud,  Oglala Lakota  (1822 – December 10, 1909)

"When you were born, you cried and the world rejoiced. Live your life so that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice." -- Cherokee Proverb

Indian chiefs who counciled with General Miles and ended the Indian War -- 1. Standing Bull, 2. Bear Who Looks Back Running [Stands and Looks Back], 3. Has the Big White Horse, 4. White Tail, 5. Liver [Living] Bear, 6. Little Thunder, 7. Bull Dog, 8. High Hawk, 9. Lame, 10. Eagle Pipe. Created in 1891 by Grabill, John C. H., photographer. Group portrait of Lakota chiefs, five standing and five sitting with tipi in background--probably on or near Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

"I am poor and naked, but I am the chief of the nation. We do not want riches but we do want to train our children right. Riches would do us no good. We could not take them with us to the other world. We do not want riches. We want peace and love." Chief Red Cloud

White Belly, (Sioux) - One of the first people native to North America to be photographed.

Morning White Dove Elvis' great, great, great grandmother. She was full blooded Cherokee Indian. Elvis was 1/16 Cherokee.

"The Elders say the men should look at women in a sacred way" -Cherokee

Cochise, Apache Indian Chief. "When I was young I walked all over this country, east and west, and saw no other people than the Apaches. After many summers I walked again and found another race of people had come to take it. How is it?" From the book "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" by Dee Brown.

Blackfoot Pictures

Sitting Bull refused to order his people to stop dancing, and in consequence was arrested and killed, an act that led two weeks later to the infamous massacre at Wounded Knee, where 153 Sioux Indians, mostly women and children, were needlessly slaughtered by the US Army. But the Indian spirit was not slaughtered with them. The Ghost Dance continues to this day, and to some large extent the hopes of many Native Americans remain pinned to the prophecy that spawned it. ...

Native American Code of Ethics Rise with the sun to pray. Pray alone. Pray often. The Great Spirit will listen, if you only speak. Be tolerant of those who are lost on their path. Ignorance, conceit, anger, jealousy and greed stem from a lost soul. Pray that they will find guidance. Search for yourself, by yourself. Do not allow others to make your path for you. It is your road, and yours alone. Others may walk it with you, but no one can walk it for you.

Bull Chief, an Indian Warrior. It was made in 1908 by Edward S. Curtis.

"I would like to quote a very prejudicial doctrine that was handed down by the Supreme Court in 1823. It said that the Indian Nations do not have title to their lands because they weren't Christians. That the first Christian Nations to discover an area of heathen lands has the absolute title. This doctrine should be withdrawn and renounced to establish a new basis for relationship between indigenous peoples and other peoples of the world." - Floyd Westerman (Lakota First Nation)

"Kindred Spirits" by Maija

Cherokee

cherokee

proud chief

You are viewing an unusual image of Old White Man, a Crow Indian. It was taken in 1908 by Edward S. Curtis. The image shows a Head-and-shoulders portrait of Crow Indian. The Indian is in traditional dress, with a War Bonnet

Slow Bull Praying to the Great Spirit. It was created in 1907 by Edward S. Curtis. The photograph presents Slow Bull, holding pipe with mouthpiece pointing skyward, buffalo skull at his feet.

John (Fire) Lame Deer “Before our white brothers arrived to make us civilized men, we didn’t have any kind of prison. Because of this, we had no delinquents. Without a prison, there can be no delinquents. We had no locks nor keys and therefore among us there were no thieves. When someone was so poor that he couldn’t afford a horse, a tent or a blanket, he would, in that case, receive it all as a gift. We were too uncivilized to give great importance to private property. We didn’t kn...