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A treat to find in your binocular viewfield, the Cedar Waxwing is a silky, shiny collection of brown, gray, and lemon-yellow, accented with a subdued crest, rakish black mask, and brilliant-red wax droplets on the wing feathers. In fall these birds gather by the hundreds to eat berries, filling the air with their high, thin, whistles. In summer you’re as likely to find them flitting about over rivers in pursuit of flying insects, where they show off dazzling aeronautics for a forest bird.

A well-planned landscape will sustain feathered friends through the cold winter days when food is hard to find. <3

The Bohemian waxwing (Bombycilla garrulus) is a starling-sized passerine bird that breeds in the northern forests of Eurasia and North America.

The Cedar Waxwing bird (Bombycilla cedrorum) It is a medium sized, mostly brown, gray, and yellow bird named for its red wax-like wing tips. It is a native of North and Central America, breeding in open wooded areas in southern Canada and wintering in the southern half of the United States, Central America, and the far northwest of South America. It eats "Cedar cones, fruit, and insects."

The Dark-eyed Junco, commonly called snowbird because of its sudden appearance around winter bird feeding stations, is a member of the sparrow family.

Leaves swirl at sunset in a light November rain on the Merced River in Yosemite Village, California • photo: Joe Ganster on Flickr

The idea that there is a trade-off between growth and going green is pernicious and false. Experience demonstrates time and time again that greater wealth creation and a better quality of life for all go hand in hand....Soft summer rain in the forest