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One of the many amazing things about Cornwall is the sheer number of really ancient stones and monuments that are literally just lying in fields, waiting for people to notice them.

The Merry Maidens, also known as Dawn's Men (a likely corruption of the Cornish Dans Maen "Stone Dance") is a late neolithic stone circle located 2 miles km) to the south of the village of St Buryan, in Cornwall, United Kingdom.

THE NINE MAIDENS STONES: the Nine Maidens standing stones at Scotland Corner close to Winnard's Perch between Wadebridge and St Columb in Cornwall are thought to have once been part of a larger collection.

THE NINE MAIDENS STONES - the Nine Maidens standing stones at Scotland Corner close to Winnard's Perch between Wadebridge and St Columb in Cornwall are thought to have once been part of a larger collection.

Burial Cist on Twelve Mens Moor; Oliver's Cornwall - Bodmin Moor

Burial Cist on Twelve Mens Moor, Bodmin Moor, Cornwall, England

This late Stone/early Bronze Age (2500-1500BC) stone circle is renowned for both its beauty and the stories connected to it. It lies in a gently sloping field between Lamorna and St Buryan, a stone’s throw from Tregiffian barrow and a number of other ancient sites, and its remarkable qualities were first recorded in the C17th.   The regularity of spacing between stones and its truly circular form make the Boleigh Merry Maidens unusual in Cornwall

The Merry Maidens of Boleigh are one of the best known stone circles in West Cornwall.

Seventh Of The Nine Maidens 2 by runique

This megalith is the seventh of the Nine Maidens, a row of prehistoric standing stones at the edge of the St Breock Downs in Cornwall. Seventh Of The Nine Maidens 2

Men-An-Tol by Helen Dixon. Ancient standing stones on the West Penwith Moor in Cornwall, England.

Men-An-Tol, ancient standing stones on the West Penwith Moor, Cornwall: Helen Dixon Photography

Love the ancient stones

Love the ancient stones

A sea mystery legend: Morgawr. According to the myth there have been documented sightings over the years. The monster allegedly favours calm conditions and hot summers for an appearance. In the ancient language of Cornwall the name Morgawr, meaning 'Sea Giant', describes an enormous marine monster which lives in the waters of Falmouth Bay. A long-necked sea-serpent similar in appearance to the famous 'Nessie' of Loch Ness.

Morgawr: allegedly favours calm conditions and hot summers for an appearance. In the ancient language of Cornwall 'Morgawr', meaning 'sea giant', describes a marine monster which lives in the waters of Falmouth Bay.

67 Not Out: The Ancient King Doniert's Stone Of Cornwall

The day we went to visit the Hurlers Stone Circles we also passed other Cornish ancient monuments.

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