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Japanese Sho

Sho Period: Tokugawa Date: century Geography: Japan Medium: Bamboo wood, metal Dimensions: H. 7 cm in.) Classification: Aerophone-Free Reed Credit Line: The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, 1889

Sho, Edo period  The sho, the Japanese mouth organ descended from the Chinese sheng, is used in gagaku (court music). Air blown through the projecting mouthpiece circulates through the lacquer air chamber activating tiny rectangular metal reeds mounted in the sides of some of the tubes. The tubes are arranged symbolically in the form of folded phoenix wings.

fromthefloatingworld: “ Sho, Edo period The sho, the Japanese mouth organ descended from the Chinese sheng, is used in gagaku (court music). Air blown through the projecting mouthpiece circulates through the lacquer air chamber activating tiny.

Mouth organ (sho)  1715 Fujiwara Masaoki (Japanese, active early 18th century)  Object Place: Yawata, Japan

This Japanese sho, or mouth organ, is based on a very similar Chinese instrument called the sheng which has been in use for about three thousand years.

Japanese Lute (biwa)Kuro urushi unryu raden biwa 黒漆雲龍螺鈿琵琶 16-17th century.

used in Gagaku (it. "elegant music"), used at Imperial Court, Kyoto. Also a solo instrument, as seen in the pictures illustrating the Tale of Genji.

http://orgs.usd.edu/nmm/EasternAsia/1433JapaneseBiwa/1433JapanbiwafrontLG.jpg

http://orgs.usd.edu/nmm/EasternAsia/1433JapaneseBiwa/1433JapanbiwafrontLG.jpg

The shakuhachi is a Japanese end-blown flute. It was originally introduced from China into Japan in the 6th century and underwent a resurgence in the early Edo Period. The shakuhachi is traditionally made of bamboo, but versions now exist in ABS and hardwoods. It was used by the monks of the Fuke school of Zen Buddhism in the practice of suizen (blowing meditation)

Shakuhachi flute, Japanese Flute, end-blown flutes, musical instruments by Monty Levenson

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