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  • Courtney J.

    Bonnet Rouge - Also known as the Phrygian Cap, this hat was a symbol of freedom during the French Revolution.

  • Katie Back

    This phrygian cap, also called the Bonnet Rogue or liberty cap, is an nod to an ancient culture. It was worn by French revolutionaries in the 18th century to represent freedom.

  • Ann Fountain

    Bonnet Rouge, soft woolen peasants cap worn in ancient time and revived during the French Revolution to recall the Plebeian working class and fits with the popularity of neoclassicism during the 18th Century.

  • eva mole

    The Bonnet Rouge and its tricolor cockade -- more than a French fashion statement, a symbol.

Related Pins

The Bonnet Rouge and its tricolor cockade -- more than a fashion statement, a symbol.

Bonnet Rouge - Also known as the Phrygian Cap, this hat was a symbol of freedom during the French Revolution.

The death of Robespierre: The executioners wear not the traditional hangman’s hood but red bonnets representing liberty. This emphasized their belief that Robespierre’s punishment was just because it was the same to which "he had condemned so many thousands of innocent victims."

Sans-colottes: counterrevolutionists set themselves apart from the shabby "trouser brigade". You can see this woman has on her patriotic striped pants with a tri colored cockade in her hat. This style of dress is iconic of the French Revolution.

In the French Revolution, the sans-culottes were the radical partisans of the lower classes; typically urban laborers. The appellation refers to the fashionable culottes (silk knee-breeches) of the moderate bourgeois revolutionaries, as distinguished from the working class sans-culottes, who traditionally wore pantaloons (pants). During the peak of their influence, roughly 1792 to 1795, the sans-culottes provided the principal support behind the two far-left

pantaloon from the time of the French Revolution, France, linen, buttons made of bone

A symbol of the revolutionary working man, Sans Culottes ("without knee breaches") differentiated the trouser wearing working class from the knee breeches of the affluent nobility

Stripes worn in support of the French Revolution 1789.

A passport issued to Thomas Coutts in October 1789, on the eve of the French Revolution, allowing him to enter Paris to remove two of his daughters from the city.

Antoine Quentin Fouquier de Tinville, lawyer during the Revolution and Reign of Terror with a particular reputation for being sinister.

18th Century - The French Revolution
Leah Marie Brown
18th Century - The French Revolution

In the French Revolution, the sans-culottes were radical left-wing partisans of the lower classes; typically urban laborers, which dominated France.

Honoré Gabriel Riqueti, comte de Mirabeau (1749 – 1791) leader of the group which became the National Assembly. He was a moderate, favoring a constitutional monarchy. He unsuccessfully conducted secret negotiations with the French monarchy in an effort to reconcile it with the Revolution.