Clara Mae Luper was one of the early leaders of the civil rights movement in Oklahoma in the 50s. She was arrested 26 times for her civil rights activities. She led sit-ins to end segregation all over Ok. She was a candidate for the US Senate in 1972, and developed Black Voices Magazine in the the late 70s.

Frank Sinatra was a big activist in the civil rights movement, refusing to stay at hotels that didn't allow "blacks". Even using his mafia ties to help get labor unions behind JFK because he knew they shared the same opinions on equal rights.

A young Emmett Till; his death at the hands of white racists helped galvanize the Civil Rights Movement.

Marilyn was a big supporter of the Civil Rights Movement. Ella Fitzgerald was one of Marilyn’s idols and a major inspiration. The Mocambo nightclub in West Hollywood, the most popular dance spot at the time, refused to let Ella perform there because she was black. Outraged, Marilyn told the owners that if they would let Ella perform, she would be there in the front row every time Ella was onstage. She did, and the two became friends.

Civil Rights.

Ella Baker (1903–1986) Ella Baker spent her life working behind the scenes to organize the Civil Rights Movement. If she could have changed anything about the movement, it might have been to persuade the men leading it that they, too, should do more work behind the scenes. Baker was one of the visionaries who created the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957.

He was the inspiration for the 2012 film "Django Unchained". He wore a black hat and carried twin .45 Colt Peacemakers. During his 32 year career as Deputy Marshal of the Oklahoma Territory, he was single-handedly responsible for capturing over 3,000 outlaws, once bringing in 17 men at one time. And in that period of time, never once did a bullet touch him. Read the story of Bass Reeves, THE REAL DJANGO, in my blog!

Whites Only Signs From Segregation | You see, only a few decades ago, some states would have denied you the ...

Black Stars of the Civil Rights Movement. Goal was to make equality.

“I guess if I’d had any sense, I’d have been a little scared – but what was the point of being scared? The only thing they could do was kill me, and it kinda seemed like they’d been trying to do that a little bit at a time since I could remember.” - Spoken by Fannie Lou Hamer, a civil rights and voting rights leader, on why she put her life in danger when she volunteered to register to vote. She later became a key organizer in the Mississippi Freedom Summer 1964.

COURAGE---Civil rights movement...We all have come a long way!

August 1936. "People living in miserable poverty. Elm Grove, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma." by Dorothea Lange for the Farm Security Administration.

Marlene Dietrich, "a German who had renounced her country following the rise of the Nazis and rejected Hitler's request that she return--became an ardent and fearless supporter of the Allied Forces, performing hundreds of times for the troops as near the war zone as she could get." " When asked why she had traveled to war zones to entertain and comfort Allied troops, she famously and simply replied, "aus Anstand." "It was the decent thing to do.""

Claudette Colvin. Nine months before Rosa Parks’ famous bus boycott, Colvin at 15 refused to give up her seat to a white passenger. She was inspired to stand up for her rights after learning about African American leaders in school. Civil rights leaders didn't publicize her story because she became an unwed mother

Widow of slain Civil Rights activist Medgar Evers comforts her grieving son Darrell during the funeral. Photo by John Loengard.

civil rights.

The Colored American Magazine

Viola Liuzzo (1925-1965) She Died Fighting For Civil Rights Viola Fauver Liuzzo belonged to the NAACP at the height of the civil rights movement. In 1965, she marched with Martin Luther King from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to protest discrimination. Afterwards, Liuzzo and her black co-worker, Leroy Merton, drove marchers to the airport. On one trip, they were spotted by four Ku Klux Klansmen who guessed that a white woman and a black man traveling together were civil rights activists.

Books Worth, Art, African Black, African American History, Black History, Photo, Civil Rights Movement

Civil rights activist Elizabeth Victoria Spencer being carried away by police during a segregation protest in 1963.