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THE CORE OF OUR GALAXY, seen in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Blue light is from stars, green light is from polycyclic carbon molecules, yellow and red light is from the thermal glow of warm dust. This image spans approximately 1000 light years by 1600 light years. The galactic core is 26,000 light years away.

The Porpoise Galaxy from Hubble - Just a few hundred million years ago, NGC 2936, the upper of the two large galaxies shown, was likely a normal spiral galaxy -- spinning, creating stars -- and minding its own business. But then it got too close to the massive elliptical galaxy NGC 2937 below and took a dive. Dubbed the Porpoise Galaxy for its iconic shape, NGC 2936 is not only being deflected but also being distorted by the close gravitational interaction.

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42 Mind-Blowing Photos Of Space From The Hubble Telescope

"This double star cluster of stars, named NGC 1850, is found in one of earth's neighboring galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud."

The Sombrero Galaxy (also known as M104 or NGC 4594) is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light years from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. The dark dust lane and the bulge give this galaxy the appearance of a sombrero.

Galaxy

Galaxy

Galaxy

This is a map of the universe within 500 million light years. It shows most of the major galaxy superclusters that surround the Virgo supercluster.

#Astronomy: #Quasar: Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black

Central area of the Milky Way galaxy, released by astronomers at the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory in Chile. The photo shows 84 million stars in an image measuring 108,500×81,500, which contains nearly 9 billion pixels, and is actually a composite of thousands of individual photographs shot with the observatory's VISTA survey telescope.