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On March 25, 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire kills 146 garment workers in New York City. It remains one of the worst U.S. disasters since the Industrial Revolution.

Funeral On April 5, 1911, the union that had been organizing in the garment industry, the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU), arranged a funeral along Fifth Avenue for the victims. More than 120,000 people marched; 300,000 people lined up to watch.

On March 25, 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire kills 146 garment workers in New York City. It remains one of the worst U.S. disasters since the Industrial Revolution.

3.)This is where Bella, and Yetta worked until they went on strike.

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire [1911] Photographer: International Ladies Garmet workers Union Picture of bodies at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company. Company rules were to keep doors closed to the factory so workers (mostly immigrant women) couldn’t leave or steal. When a fire ignited, disaster struck. 146 people died that day.

Clara Lemlich led the Uprising of N.Y. garment workers. "I am a working girl, one of those striking against intolerable conditions," she told the crowd. "And I have no further patience for talk." 700 of the women she led on the strike were arrested, 19 were sentenced to labor camps. The next year a fire in her workplace, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, killed 146 workers: steel doors had been bolted shut to prevent workers from going on breaks. She lived to be 96.

San Francisco earthquake and fire, 1906. Over 225,000 of the city’s 400,000 residents were homeless. Fires destroyed about 28,000 buildings and 500 blocks – ¼ of San Francisco.

International Ladies Garment Union Workers Union strike, 1909. Just two years before the Triangle Factory fire, the Women’s Trade Union League campaigned for the 8 hour work day and safe working conditions.

Philadelphia 1925 what factories looked like

Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Memorial, Mount Zion Cemetery, New York (International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union)

An unidentified woman who worked at the Four Wheel Drive factory in Clintonville assembling trucks during World War I. She is wearing a special uniform for women workers (c.1918). #vintage #WW1 #homefront