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Liubo board and pieces, Han dynasty (206 B.C.–220 A.D.), 1st century B.C.–1st century A.D. China, probably Luoyang, Henan Province Earthenware with pigment, bone; L. 14 1/4 in. (36.2 cm)

Liubo board and pieces, Han dynasty (206 B.C.–220 A.D.), 1st century B.C.–1st century A.D. China, probably Luoyang, Henan Province Earthenware with pigment, bone; L. 14 1/4 in. (36.2 cm)

Liubo  Backgammon online --> on.fb.me/1869cF3

Liubo Backgammon online --> on.fb.me/1869cF3

pallanguzhi -  traditional ancient game from Tamil Nadu. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pallanguzhi

pallanguzhi - traditional ancient game from Tamil Nadu. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pallanguzhi

Els escacs de Tamerlà / Tamerlane Chess / El ajedrez de Tamerlán: http://ambdestinacioasamarcanda.blogspot.com.es/2013/06/els-escacs-de-tamerla.html

Els escacs de Tamerlà / Tamerlane Chess / El ajedrez de Tamerlán: http://ambdestinacioasamarcanda.blogspot.com.es/2013/06/els-escacs-de-tamerla.html

Knossos game is the ancient board game discovered by Evans in the Palace of Knossos and goes back to 1600 BC. It is a "race game", but at the same time something more. It portrays an ancient symbolism about life and the trip to Hades with a return back to life. A gap between the two parts of the board is supposed to represent the River-Ocean that separates the world of the living from the world of the dead.

Knossos game is the ancient board game discovered by Evans in the Palace of Knossos and goes back to 1600 BC. It is a "race game", but at the same time something more. It portrays an ancient symbolism about life and the trip to Hades with a return back to life. A gap between the two parts of the board is supposed to represent the River-Ocean that separates the world of the living from the world of the dead.

You better believe it.

You better believe it.

The viking Hnefatafl gaming board found on the Brough of Deerness this summer. (The Orcadian/Orkney Media Group)

The viking Hnefatafl gaming board found on the Brough of Deerness this summer. (The Orcadian/Orkney Media Group)

Trondheim, Norway	early twelfth century;	this 'Hnefatafl' board with 11 x 11 squares is displayed at the Medieval Museum at the University of Trondheim (NTNU)

Trondheim, Norway early twelfth century; this 'Hnefatafl' board with 11 x 11 squares is displayed at the Medieval Museum at the University of Trondheim (NTNU)

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