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  • Jan

    Gale Crater, Mars A June 2012 revision of the landing target area for Curiosity, the big rover of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, reduces the area's size. It also puts the center of the landing area closer to Mount Sharp, which bears geological layers that are the mission's prime destination.

  • Alessandro Raffini

    NASA's Curiosity rover landed in the Martian crater known as Gale Crater, which is approximately the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined. A green dot shows where the rover landed, well within its targeted landing ellipse, outlined in blue. This oblique view of Gale, and Mount Sharp in the center, is derived from a combination of elevation and imaging data from three Mars orbiters.

  • Cygnus Jim

    Aeolis Mons rises from the middle of Gale Crater - Green dot marks Curiosity's landing site (marked by blue elipse) in Aeolis Palus. Gale Crater is approximately the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined. Mount Sharp, in the center, is derived from a combination of elevation and imaging data from three Mars orbiters. The view is looking toward the southeast. Mount Sharp rises about 3.4 miles (5.5 km) above the floor of Gale Crater. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA/DLR/FU Berlin/MSSS

  • Bill Smith

    Aug 5, 2012: Gale Crater, Mars. Gale Crater spans 96 miles (154 kilometers) in diameter and holds a mountain (which is informally named "Mount Sharp" to pay tribute to geologist Robert P. Sharp)

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