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  • Audrey Wright

    Christmas Tree Worm | 15 Amazing Sea Creatures You Can Hardly Believe Are Real http://www.buzzfeed.com/audreyw11/15-amazing-sea-creatures-you-can-hardly-believe-ar-gsnz

  • Senior N Campania

    Christmas tree worms, Spirobranchus giganteus, are found on coral reefs in tropical waters worldwide. They have been known to occur from the Caribbean to the Indonesian Pacific.

  • Sherldine Tomlinson

    Christmas Tree Worm - Spirobranchus Giganteus. We love the creatures of the ocean because they are all strange and beautiful at the same time. The reason these are called Christmas Tree Worms is because their mouth appendages are shaped like the branches of a Christmas tree. These worms use these appendages for both food (they eat phytoplankton) and breathing.

  • Maria Baldwin

    The reason these are called Christmas Tree Worms is because their mouth appendages are shaped like the branches of a Christmas tree. These worms use these appendages for both food (they eat phytoplankton) and breathing. What put Christmas tree worms on this list is that you can't even tell that they are animals until someone points it out. To most people, they look like very unusual plants, but now we know that those aren't plants, but very strange and very exotic worms.

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Christmas tree worms sea, sea life, life, animals, ocean, oceans, ocean life, aquatic, aquatic animals, fish, marine, marine biology, water, under water life

Sea Life

Under the sea - Seafan with school of silvery fish, Mayne Rock, West Coast of Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

"Son passato sulle strisce pedonali ancora fresche... per fortuna non si vede!" #ironia #sea #smile

Google Street View is Now Underwater by Heather Kelly, CNN: Christmas tree worms on Opal Reef, Great Barrier Reef. #Google_Street_View #Great_Barrier_Reef #Christmas_Tree_Worms

Alitta virens, photographed by Alexander Semenov. This creature is commonly known as a sandworm. The Wikipedia article on them said they can reach... uh... more than four feet in length. I don't think I'd like to meet one outside of Alex's laboratory photos...

"Sentinel of the Grove" (1988) by Stephen Lyman ...roosting in the branches