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  • Lacie Jefferson

    Profound! A woman stands behind a police barrier, holding an American flag during the 1965 Selma, Alabama Civil Rights Movement.

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"The National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) was founded on December 5, 1935, with the support of the leaders of 28 of the most notable black women's organizations. The founder and president until 1949, Mary McLeod Bethune, envisioned a unified force of black women's groups fighting to improve racial conditions nationally and internationally.

Harriet Tubman (www.biography.com...)

Warriors - Mary McLeod Bethune, Ida B. Wells, Nannie Helen Burroughs and others at a Baptist Women's gathering, in Chicago.

These individuals attended the Negro Contractors' Conference at Hampton Institute, in Virginia. The central figure is Ethel Bailey Furman (1893 – 1976). Furman was probably the first practicing female African American architect in the Commonwealth of Virginia. She studied in New York and Chicago. Furman designed numerous public and private buildings in Richmond and the surrounding area including Fair Oak Baptist Church in Richmond and Mount Nebo Baptist Church in New Kent County.

Coretta Scott King, Coretta Scott was born in Heiberger, Alabama and raised on the farm of her parents Bernice McMurry Scott, and Obadiah Scott, in Perry County, Alabama.

The Only Woman Electrocuted in Georgia's Electric Chair Such is the story of Lena Baker, an African-American mother of three, who was electrocuted at the Georgia State Prison in Reidsville.

Dr. Eliza Ann Grier was the first African American woman licensed to practice medicine in Georgia.

Lovie Yancey - Founder of Fatburger She was the founder of the Fatburger restaurant chain, which began with a popular post-World War II hamburger stand in South Los Angeles.

Bessie Coleman, the daughter of a poor, southern, African American family, became one of the most famous women and African American in aviation history.

In December 1957, Mohawk Airlines hired the first African-American stewardess in the United States, Ruth Carol Taylor. Within months, TWA announced that it would hire a black stewardess, making it the first large airline to break the color barrier in passenger service.

A teenager staring down a guard during the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March for voting rights. Think about it ... she as well as all the others ran the risk of being beaten, water hosed, having dogs put on them, or jail.

Because of the Southern strategy adopted by much of the white woman suffrage movement, Black women formed their own organizations to fight for the right to vote and then exercise that right. The organization shown here had its headquarters in Georgia in the early part of the 20th century.

Mrs. Lizzie Sheppard, She brought a supremacist to court: Charging that a white preacher struck her with a rake when she refused to get off the sidewalk in front of his home, 5 1/2 months pregnant Mrs. Lizzie Sheppard listens as Rev. Elbert D. Riddick pleads his case in a Portland, Oregon courtroom. For his crime he was fined $50.00.

Elizabeth Keckley bought her freedom and rose to become Mary Todd Lincoln's dress designer and personal confidant.

A woman stands behind a police barrier, holding an American flag during the 1965 Selma, Alabama Civil Rights Movement.

Amanda Smith, an African-American woman employed in the Long Beach Plant of the Douglas Aircraft Company.

Ruby Bridges, one of the first African Americans to attend a white school.

Elizabeth Keckley bought her freedom and rose to become Mary Todd Lincoln's dress designer and personal confidant. Born a slave and fathered by a white plantation owner in Virginia. Ms. Keckley worked as a dressmaker in St. Louis, using her skills to buy freedom for herself and her son (a son she had after being raped by a white man).

After graduating from the segregated Langston University with top honors in 1945, Fisher volunteered to be the successful test case for admission to the University of Oklahoma Law School represented by NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall and Oklahoma attorney Amos T. Hall.

Sojourner Truth was the self-given name, from 1843 onward, of Isabella Baumfree, an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist. Truth was born into slavery in Swartekill, New York, but escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. Her best-known extemporaneous speech on racial inequalities, Ain't I a Woman?, was delivered in 1851 at the Ohio Women's Rights.

Bessie Coleman, the daughter of a poor, southern, African American family, became one of the most famous women and African Americans in aviation history. "Brave Bessie" or "Queen Bess," as she became known, faced the double difficulties of racial and gender discrimination in early 20th-century America but overcame such challenges to become the first African American woman to earn a pilot's license.