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William Othello Wilson, a native of Hagerstown, Maryland, was born on September 16, 1867. He enlisted in the United States Army on August 21, 1889. He earned the Medal of Honor on December 30, 1890 for "gallantry in action voluntarily", for successfully carrying a message to the battalion commander at the Pine Ridge Indian Agency in South Dakota.

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Community Post: Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

historic photo

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Community Post: Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

"'Oh! How I love the old flag.' Rebecca, A Slave Girl from New Orleans", 1863-64. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

Macon Allen was the first African American to graduate was the first African American licensed to practice law in the United States, in Maine in 1844. He is also believed to be the first to hold a judicial position.

"Two United States Army nurses carry heavy combat packs on a eight-mile hike through the jungle as part of their training before taking up front-line war assignments. Before reporting for duty the American nurses learn how to combat jungle hazards and how to care both for themselves and their patients under all conditions."

Geronimo (1829-1909) was a prominent leader of the Bedonkohe Apache who fought against Mexico and the United States for their expansion into Apache tribal lands for several decades during the Apache Wars. "Geronimo" was the name given to him during a battle with Mexican soldiers. His Chiricahua name is often rendered as Goyathlay or Goyahkla in English.

This 1940s ad for Pepsi is one of the first ads specifically targeted toward African Americans. The young boy pictured is Ron Brown, future United States Secretary of Commerce.

U.S. Martin Luther King Jr being attacked as he marched nonviolently for the Chicago Freedom Movement, 1966, which was the most ambitious civil rights campaign in the North of the United States, and lasted from mid-1965 to early 1967. ~People can be so mean!

The Only Woman Electrocuted in Georgia's Electric Chair Such is the story of Lena Baker, an African-American mother of three, who was electrocuted at the Georgia State Prison in Reidsville. She was convicted for the fatal shooting of E. B. Knight, a white Cuthbert, Georgia mill operator she was hired to care for after he broke his leg. She was 44 and the only woman ever executed in Georgia’s electric chair. For Baker, a Black maid in the segregated south in the 1940’s, her story was a t...

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Memorial Photo Woman w/ Glasses - Hagerstown, Maryland - King Photography

Memorial Photo Woman w Glasses Hagerstown Maryland King Photography | eBay

Born into slavery in Thomasville, Georgia, on March 21, 1856, Henry Ossian Flipper was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1873. Over the next four years he overcame harassment, isolation, and insults to become West Point’s first African American graduate and the first African American commissioned officer in the regular U.S. Army.

Colin Powell is a retired Four-Star United States Army General who was the first African American to serve as National Security Advisor, Chairman of the Joints Chief of Staff and Secretary of State.

John McCausland - Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army, famous for the ransom of Hagerstown, Maryland, and the razing of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, during the American Civil War.