"CAKEWALK" | It's origins in slavery, the cakewalk mocked the rich folks in the "Big House," and southern high-society. Bowing, bending and a high-stepping promenade were characteristic of the dance. In many instances the Cakewalk was performance, and even competition. The dance would be held at the master’s house on the plantation and he would serve as judge. The dance’s name comes from the cake that would be awarded to the winning couple.

Dust bowl life. Interesting fact: when the flour companies learned that the poor in the dust bowl were sewing flour bags together to make dresses and other clothing for the children, they began selling their flour in different decorative bags with flowers and such things printed on them so that the "clothing" made would be a bit more attractive and fun. And the little girls really appreciated that. It's the little things....

Slavery

Black family on a plantation, slavery, slaves, history, photograph, photo b/w.

The Horror of Slavery. The good book made people feel comfortable doing this to people in the american south.

Actor Russell Johnson, best known as "The Professor" on Gilligan's Island, served in the US Army Air Force during WWII. He flew 44 combat missions as a bombardier in B-25 bombers. In March 1945, he and two other B-25s were shot down in the Philippines. He broke both his ankles and the radioman next to him was killed. Johnson earned a Purple Heart, among other honors. He was honorably discharged and later served in the Army Reserve. He used his GI Bill to fund his acting lessons.

The South’s Shocking Hidden History: Thousands of Blacks Forced Into Slavery Until WW2

The Great Depression. This picture shows a man is jumping out of the window while the meeting is going on. This picture represent the great depression because people could not find a solution to slow down the depression, and people do not have enough money to live in the bad economy.

#slavery

African history. One scholar said, black folks continued to focus on the last 500 years of slavery and oppression, forgetting or ignoring the previous thousands of years of our glorious history. But, that's the distracting game! It is full time that we move on and re-connect with our glorious past, which is still UN-surpassed by any other human developments and evolution unpon the planet earth!

Black History Heroes: Sojourner Truth: Slavery Abolitionist and Women's Suffragist

Slavery

Can-Can dancers at the Moulin Rouge in the 1890's

Slaves and slave cabin

These children were evicted legally--though at gunpoint--from their homes on the Dibble plantation near Parkin Arkansas, in January 1936. Plantation owners charged, and the court agreed, that because the parents belonged to the Southern Tenant Farmers Union, they were engaged in "a conspiracy to retain their homes." These families lived by the side of the road until they were moved to a tent colony. Photo by John Vachon.

The famous ” Feed sack dress” – 1940s ration fashion -- when the flour companies learned that the poor in the dust bowl were sewing flour bags together to make dresses and other clothing for the children, they began selling their flour in different decorative bags with flowers and such things printed on them so that the "clothing" made would be a bit more attractive and fun.

Did you know in Florida during slavery slave masters would take a enslaved black child tie a rope around his or her legs put them in the water and use them for ALLIGATOR BAIT. Two movies in 1900 “Alligator Bait” and “Gator and the Pickaninny.” both showed and proved this practice.There were many advertisements and postcards in the South that proved this was real

Einstein, when he arrived in America, was shocked at how Black Americans were treated. “There is separation of colored people from white people in the United States," he said. "That separation is not a disease of colored people. It is a disease of white people. And, I do not intend to be quiet about it.” And, he wasn't.

The Cakewalk was a dance that was performed by slaves at get togethers on plantations. There are many theories as to its origin, one being that slaves borrowed the dance from the Seminole Indian tribe. The dance caught on in society in the late 1800's and at the end the couple who performed it best was awarded a cake. First performed only by men, it became the fashion to have women participate in the 1890's at which time the dance reached epic and ridiculous proportions.

I don't really understand why these people talk so differently than I do, espescially Calpurnia. I wish everyone were to be treated equal. I would like to help with that in the future.

Maude Callen on duty. In December 1951, LIFE published one of the most extraordinary photo essays ever to appear in the magazine. In W. Eugene Smith’s pictures, the story of a tireless South Carolina nurse and midwife named Maude Callen working in the rural South in the 1950s. She served as “doctor, dietician, psychologist, bail-goer and friend” to thousands of poor (most of them desperately poor) patients — only two percent of whom were white.