Explore Detroit and more!

Explore related topics

I love Detroit - via Instagram

I love Detroit - via Instagram

Downtown Detroit in 1915

These Pictures Of Vintage Detroit Will Surprise You

Detroit circa 1919. "View of Madison Theatre and Woodward Avenue." Now playing: "Choosing a Wife" and Fatty Arbuckle in "A Desert Hero." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company.

Detroit circa 1919. "View of Madison Theatre and Woodward Avenue." Now playing: "Choosing a Wife" and Fatty Arbuckle in "A Desert Hero." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company.

Detroit, Michigan, circa 1905. "Goebel Brewing Co., bottling works."

Detroit, Michigan, circa 1905. "Goebel Brewing Co., bottling works."

Detroit Masonic Temple - 500 Temple St., Detroit, Michigan, USA.  Built in 1922.  Architect:  George Mason Architectural style:	Neo-gothic architecture

Detroit Masonic Temple - 500 Temple St., Detroit, Michigan, USA. Built in 1922. Architect: George Mason Architectural style: Neo-gothic architecture

The Fisher Building. My favorite building in Detroit!

The Fisher Building. My favorite building in Detroit!

15+ Then And Now Photos That Show The Shocking Transformation Of Detroit - AroundMe.com

15+ Then And Now Photos That Show The Shocking Transformation Of Detroit - AroundMe.com

Beautiful photo of the Ren Cen downtown Detroit! Two of my brothers worked on the construction of the Ren Cen.

Beautiful photo of the Ren Cen downtown Detroit! Two of my brothers worked on the construction of the Ren Cen.

Brush Park, 1881 and 2013. Brush Park was once home to Detroit's wealthy elite, a neighborhood of Gilded Age and Victorian homes that covered over 20 blocks. As the city expanded through the early 1900's, Brush Park's residents moved to outlying areas, and the neighborhood became a rundown slum. Today about 70 of the original 300 homes remain. While many of the homes have been lost, some of have been restored, and others like the one above are stabilized and are awaiting restoration.

Brush Park, 1881 and 2013. Brush Park was once home to Detroit's wealthy elite, a neighborhood of Gilded Age and Victorian homes that covered over 20 blocks. As the city expanded through the early 1900's, Brush Park's residents moved to outlying areas, and the neighborhood became a rundown slum. Today about 70 of the original 300 homes remain. While many of the homes have been lost, some of have been restored, and others like the one above are stabilized and are awaiting restoration.

Pinterest
Search