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The Prairie Homesteadfrom The Prairie Homestead

30+ Things to Do with Eggshells

It’s been rather egg-y around The Prairie Homestead lately. We’ve talked about whether or not to wash farm fresh eggs and how to go about freezing them for later.  Another egg-related question that has recently come up is: What to do with with leftover eggshells? Composting them is definitely one option, but did you know you can feed them back to your chicken flock?

Yummy Mummy Kitchenfrom Yummy Mummy Kitchen

All about raising chickens and eggs

All about raising chickens and eggs -- I really want to do this!

If you're planning on raising livestock (whether backyard suburban chickens or free range cattle) get the info you need to choose the best meat to raise re: ratio for food, shelter, length of time to table, etc. The infographic compares different livestock species.

Plant "Butterfly Bushes" in the chicken run for them to hide in. Chickens won't eat it & the flowers attract bugs for them to eat & it grows fast & provides shade.

The Chicken Chickfrom The Chicken Chick

Cucumber Tetherball: Chicken Boredom Buster

Cucumber Tetherball can be offered to chickens as an occasional snack while doing double-duty as a boredom buster- for the chickens and for you!

Chicken Run Landscaping - She has some great info, with pictures, of what types of bushes, shrubs and flowers you can plant that are not toxic to chickens AND that they won't eat. ...because apparently, they will eat quite a few plants. She also tells you why these particular plants are beneficial to the chickens.

Gardening Tip - Put Epsom salts and sugar into each hole with your plant. It makes them grow larger, leafier and greener.

If they die we die - help them in your garden by planting open single head flowers, planting the same plants in clusters rather than peppered around the garden, plant for a succession of flowers throughout the year. Some good varieties include snowdrops, aconites, blackthorn, mahonia, hollyhocks, foxgloves, forget me nots, borage, lavender, wild thyme, buddleia and let the clover grow in your lawn. If you have space for a wild patch they also love dandelion and nettle.

The Prairie Homesteadfrom The Prairie Homestead

8 Ways to Use Chickens in the Garden

One chicken can...

Lifehackerfrom Lifehacker

Dip Plant Stems and Cuttings in Cinnamon Before Planting to Prevent Fungal Infection

Use cinnamon as a substitute for rooting hormone. It also kills fungus and bacteria at the same time. It acts more as a fungicide than a rooting stimulator. However, when rooting new growth/tip cuttings there are usually rooting auxins in the green growth of the cuttings already so no need to add rooting hormone.