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The new issue no. 31 of VMAN features this fantastic footwear story, photographed by Dan Forbes and styled by Julian Antetomaso.

slave bracelets, fantasy armor, chainmaille, handflower, dragon, costume, scale, armor, scalemail, bellydance, tribal, larp, warrior.

by H. R. Giger

In the esoteric tradition the Orphic Egg represents the soul of the philosopher, the serpent symbolizing the Mysteries. The egg signifies the Cosmos as encircled by the fiery Creative Spirit. The egg, a symbol for the earth, around which the snake (a feminine symbol, as is the moon) winds itself. The spiraling snake resembles the path our moon takes - the head and the tip of the serpent’s tail representing the moon’s position at its apparent halt in orbit.

Meet Darcilio Lima, The Obscure Brazilian Artist Who Helped Shape Surrealism

Meet Darcilio Lima, The Obscure Brazilian Artist Who Helped Shape Surrealism

Meet Darcilio Lima, The Obscure Brazilian Artist Who Helped Shape Surrealism

Meet Darcilio Lima, The Obscure Brazilian Artist Who Helped Shape Surrealism

Hercules Bronze. Le Louvre, Paris

Jörmungand and also known as the Midgard Serpent (Old Norse: Midgarðsormr), or World Serpent, who is a titanic sea serpent, and the middle child of the giantess Angrboða and the God Loki. Jörmungandr's arch-enemy is the God Thor.

Medusa, seeing herself as she once was rather than what she was made into. (I like this, it really captures the tragedy of Medusa's fate. Catching Athena's attention was a dangerous thing if you weren't a strapping hero! She didn't seem to like her own gender much at all!)

Artwork by Dr Lakra for BON magazine, 2011

snake charmer

Lex Drewinski

The Case for Lilith

Madonna Mert & Marcus

Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty Scarves | Hint Fashion Magazine

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Illustration by Warwick Reynolds, from Carl Ewald's "The Pond" (London: Thornton Butterworth, 1922).

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Ex Libris for Carl Messer by Ephraim Mose Lilien, 1906. Lilien (1874–1925) was an Art Nouveau illustrator and print-maker, particularly noted for his art on Jewish and Zionist themes. He is sometimes called the "first Zionist artist"

Jewellery illustration by Olaf Hajek for Spread Magazine, NY

Dangerous Paradise by Olaf Hajek. ~via Olaf Hajek, FB

Medusa by Olaf Hajek