In a late version of the Medusa myth, related by the Roman poet Ovid (Metamorphoses 4.770) Medusa was originally a ravishingly beautiful maiden, "the jealous aspiration of many suitors," but because Poseidon had raped her in Athena's temple, the enraged Athena transformed Medusa's beautiful hair to serpents and made her face so terrible to behold that the mere sight of it would turn onlookers to stone.

In a late version of the Medusa myth, related by the Roman poet Ovid (Metamorphoses 4.770) Medusa was originally a ravishingly beautiful maiden, "the jealous aspiration of many suitors," but because Poseidon had raped her in Athena's temple, the enraged Athena transformed Medusa's beautiful hair to serpents and made her face so terrible to behold that the mere sight of it would turn onlookers to stone.

Minotaur. Greek mythological monster, had the body of man and head of a bull. He was killed at the hands of Theseus.

Minotaur. Greek mythological monster, had the body of man and head of a bull. He was killed at the hands of Theseus.

The Fates in Greek mythology, the Moiraioften known in English as the Fates—were the robed incarnations of destiny. Their number became fixed at three: Clotho (spinner), Lachesis (allotter) and Atropos(unturnable). They controlled the metaphorical thread of life of every mortal from birth to death. They were independent, at the helm of necessity, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being by eternal laws might take its course without obstruction.

The Fates in Greek mythology, the Moiraioften known in English as the Fates—were the robed incarnations of destiny. Their number became fixed at three: Clotho (spinner), Lachesis (allotter) and Atropos(unturnable). They controlled the metaphorical thread of life of every mortal from birth to death. They were independent, at the helm of necessity, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being by eternal laws might take its course without obstruction.

Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas
Search