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(Image: "Avenues of Early Settlement" Source: C. Camp. ed., Influence of Geography upon Early North Carolina (Raleigh: Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission, 1963). This article, entitled "Early Settlement" by David Goldfield, Professor of History at UNC, Charlotte, 2005, outlines in careful detail the development of the frontier in the North Carolina Colony during the period, 1657 through 1835.

Waldensians church, Torre Pellice, Italy

Waldensian historical sites - Italy

It was a journey of faith as the Waldensians made their exile from the Alpine Valleys of Italy to America. Relive their experience on a tour of the Waldensian Trail of Faith, which brings their struggles to life, commemorates their sacrifices and celebrates their triumphs. www.waldensiantra...

Appian Way, Rome...constructed over 2000 years ago and still in use today.

Agape defines itself as an ecumenical center and applies the term, “ecumenical,” in a very open sense. The word encompasses the given encounter between believers of different faiths and religious confessions, but also takes on a secular character, meaning that even those without religious confession can feel at home. Agape is located in one of the Waldensian Valleys, the only area in Italy where protestants constitute a significant presence in the population.

The Telescope of Galileo, Museo Galileo, Florence Italy

Torre Pellice, val Pellice, western Piedmont, Italy, site of religious persecution of the Waldenses.

"Ordered by Francis I of France, roughly 2,000 soldiers were sent in to slaughter the Waldensian population within the village of Merindol, and over twenty other towns. Because of their connection to the Protestants, Calvinists and other unorthodox, heretical “opposition” groups, the scourge of the Waldensians was approved by Pope Paul III and the Catholic Church."

American pacifist James Zwerg after being beaten by a mob in Montgomery, Alabama in 1960 as part of the Freedom Riders. Zwerg volunteered to leave the bus first upon arriving in Montgomery, knowing he’d be the blunt of the violent crowd’s aggression. He would have died that day if an anonymous black man hadn’t stepped in and saved his life by deflecting the mob’s attention to himself.