• Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

    Horticulturist Liz Fogel says that most of your plants tonight will be fine. However, sensitive plants (those not well-adjusted to cold temperatures in the 30s) will need a little TLC. Some of those plants include hydrangeas, vegetable gardens, annuals, and anything newly planted (both in-ground and in-pots). New plants are especially sensitive because they’ve never been exposed to these temperatures and simply aren’t hardy enough yet.

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Senior horticulturist Elizabeth Fogel showing rose rosette disease on one branch. The branch in the background is still healthy.

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"Frances Palmer is a well-known potter, a passionate gardener, and a lover of dahlias. She's also a member of GARDEN DESIGN's design board and when she offered to write about how to grow dahlias, we were so excited to be able to feature her garden and advice." via Garden Design

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Jonathan Kavalier, chief horticulturist for the Smithsonian Gardens, provided some spring gardening tips.

Horticulturist Liz Fogel says that most of your plants tonight will be fine. However, sensitive plants (those not well-adjusted to cold temperatures in the 30s) will need a little TLC. Some of those plants include hydrangeas, vegetable gardens, annuals, and anything newly planted (both in-ground and in-pots). New plants are especially sensitive because they’ve never been exposed to these temperatures and simply aren’t hardy enough yet.

Don’t Commit Crape Murder! It’s not necessary to prune Crapemyrtles in order to make them bloom. They bloom off the new growth, anyway, and continual pruning just makes them weaker at these pruned joints. The proper way is to thin out the branches. via @Jeff Minnich's blog

Garden Now, Enjoy Later -- It's time to plant your bulbs for spring blooms! @Southern Living has some great tips plus they mention local bulb seller Brent and Becky's Bulbs.

The next time you boil a dozen eggs, save the water and pour it on your garden and plants.  The water becomes enriched with calcium when the eggs are cooked.  Plus, why pour water down the sink when you can reuse it for something, right?

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