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    Using milk jugs to plant seeds. Ive done this for years.

    3y
    3y Saved to Outdoors

    6 comments

    • Mindy Walker

      Milk jug greenhouses-- Get a bunch of perennials by planting seeds in milk jugs and putting them outside in WINTER! Use the full jug and they are mini greenhouses. No grow lights, no fussy watering schedule. Later, you cut off the top of the jug to have what is shown in the first picture!

    • National Garden Bureau

      Start Perennials the Easy Way from Garden Gate eNotes. Have the kids help you get a head start on spring by recycling gallon milk jugs into mini greenhouses!

    • L G

      * Get a bunch of perennials cheaply by planting seeds in milk jugs and putting them outside in winter. The milk jugs are mini greenhouses. No grow lights, no fussy watering schedule. In spring, you have perennials to plant in your garden!

    • Dana Wheeles

      Get a bunch of perennials cheaply by planting seeds in milk jugs and putting them outside in winter. The milk jugs are mini greenhouses.

    • Christa Martens

      plant seeds outside in winter using milk jugs as mini greenhouses. then you can transplant them in the spring when they've already taken root.

    • Lenea Martel

      winter gardening idea - great reuse idea and it gets the garden started too!

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    Tape it upAfter you’ve planted the seeds, tape the top and bottom of the milk jug together. Use either the packing or clear duct tape — they both hold up just fine outside. You’ll be taking it off later in the season when the temperatures warm up.