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Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)Novelist and critic Virginia Woolf was a pioneer of modernist literature whose work shed light on the oppressed position of women in early 20th century social and political hierarchies. In works such as To the Lighthouse, Orlando and her landmark feminist essay A Room of One's Own, Woolf used her pen to explore the artistic, sexual and religious roles that women held at this monumental time in women's history.

Adeline Virginia Woolf (1882 - 1941) was an English writer, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a central figure in the influential Bloomsbury Group of intellectuals. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927) Orlando (1928), and the book-length essay A Room of One's Own (1929).

Malala Yousafzai, of Pakistan, is the youngest person (age 15) ever nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. World famous for defying the Taliban in support of women’s rights and education for girls. On October 9, 2012, Yousafzai was shot in the head and neck by a Taliban assassin when she was returning home on a school bus full of students. She survived the attack and is expected to make a full recovery, but Taliban leaders have vowed to continue their efforts to kill Yousafzai and her father.

Mail Onlinefrom Mail Online

The wife who changed history - by asking for the first divorce

Meet Caroline Norton. If you have gone through a divorce and had someone advocate for your rights, you have her to thank for it. In the mid 1800's Caroline was in a loveless marriage to a man who beat her savagely. On several occasions she was thrown out of her own home, and forbidden access to her children. In those days, married women were put into the same category as "lunatics, idiots, outlaws and children". Their rights were in the hands of others. Caroline petitioned...

Rita Levi-Montalcini (1909-2012). Italian neurologist 103 years active and working. Nobel Prize (Physiology/Medicine) for her discovery of nerve growth factor. Inspiring for all women. ~ 'I tell young people: Do not think of yourself, think of others. Think of the future that awaits you, think about what you can do and do not fear anything. Do not fear the difficulties: I've had many in the past and I crossed without fear, with total indifference for myself'

Amelia Earhart. Women across the globe looked to her for inspiration, and became impassioned by her dedication to women’s causes. Even Eleanor Roosevelt became one of her closest friends and admirers.

Virginaia Woolf (1882-1941) Source: worldoffemale.com ~A Feminist, novelist & critic. She 'threw light on' the oppression of women in the early 20th century. Used her writings to 'reach out' to the public on many issues, such as the social hierarchies of her day. Woolf suffered a lifetime of depression which led to her suicide.

BuzzFeedfrom BuzzFeed

Extraordinary Women Of History You Need To Know Now

Fe del Mundo, Harvard Medical School's first female student , was admitted because she was brilliant...and because they didn't realize she was a woman. Del Mundo founded the first pediatric hospital in the Philippines. She attended nine years before enrollment was opened to women.

Margaret Hamilton, lead software engineer of the Apollo Project, stands next to the code she wrote by hand and that was used to take humanity to the moon. [1969] 55 Powerful Photos Of Women Who Changed History Forever

"Get it straight: I'm not a humanitarian, I'm a hell-raiser." 1912 speech given by activist Mother Jones to West Virginia miners. She was a fearless fighter for workers’ rights.

Lucy Stone - determined that men were reading the Bible in a way to suppress women, she worked her way through school to learn Greek and Latin to prove them wrong. Kept her last name, chopped her hair off, scandalously wore precursors to pants, was kicked out of church for arguing that women had the right to own property and to be able to divorce abusive alcoholic husbands. Considered a true radical for her time, she spoke in public frequently and headed multiple prominent womens…

Good Housekeepingfrom Good Housekeeping

125 Most Influential Women

Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English writer, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century

Lucy Ann Stanton, the first black American woman to receive a four-year college degree. Born in Cleveland on Oct. 16, 1831, she entered Oberlin College in the mid-1840s. She became president of the Oberlin Ladies Literary Society and in 1850 delivered the graduation address entitled "A Plea For The Oppressed," an anti-slavery speech.

Rosalind Franklin (1920 - 1958) was a British physicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses. Unpublished drafts of her papers (written just as she was arranging to leave King's College London) show that she had independently determined structure of the DNA helix. Watson & Crick received the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1962 for this work, four years after Franklin’s death of ovarian cancer.

Good Housekeepingfrom Good Housekeeping

125 Most Influential Women

Toni Morrison 1931- NOVELIST The first African American to win the Nobel Prize for Literature; winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Her enthralling books illuminate the mysteries of the human heart and unflinchingly take on the toughest issues.

Victoria Woodhull was an American leader of the woman's suffrage movement and a woman of many firsts. She was the first woman to start a weekly newspaper, the first woman to operate a brokerage firm on Wall Street, and in 1872, she was the first female candidate for President of the United States.