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  • Shevonne Polastre

    15, 000 Books Stacked Up Three-Story High

  • Robin Eisner

    A tower of Abraham Lincoln books the newly-constructed Ford’s Theatre Center for Education and Leadership in Washington, DC. This 34-foot pillar of literature includes over 15,000 unique titles about the United State’s 16th president, Abraham Lincoln.

  • Kara Allen

    making the book tower

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34-foot pillar of literature with over 15,000 titles about Abraham Lincoln Soon to be on display at the newly-constructed Ford’s Theatre Center for Education and Leadership in Washington, DC, this 34-foot pillar of literature includes over 15,000 unique titles about the United State’s 16th president, Abraham Lincoln. The museum is set to open before President’s Day

Americana. Centennial of Abraham Lincoln's birth, 1809 to 1909, vintage.

Abraham Lincoln reading the Bible with his son. Found out it was the Bible from an exhibit at Ford's Theater in D.C.

Last photo of Abraham Lincoln the day after Lee's surrender at Appomattox. Photo by Alexander Gardner, April 10, 1865.

Interesting fact: Lincoln was shot at, in 1863, Lincoln rode alone to the Soldiers’ Home. A shot rang out and a bareheaded Lincoln came back to the compound clinging to his steed. Lincoln explained that a gunshot had gone off at the foot of the hill, sending the horse galloping so fast it knocked his hat off. Two soldiers retrieved Lincoln’s hat, which had a bullet hole right through it. The president asked the guards to keep the incident under wraps: He didn’t want to worry his wife Mary

" If any personal description of me is thought desirable, it may be said, I am, in height, six feet, four inches, nearly; lean in flesh, weighing, on an average, one hundred and eighty pounds; dark complexion, with coarse black hair, and grey eyes -- no other marks or brands recollected"

Abraham Lincoln by Norman Rockwell - I can picture Anthony doing this with his latest Redwall book!

Lincoln wore this hat on the train journey from his home in Springfield, Illinois, to his inauguration in Washintgon, D.C. Or at least, he wore it until he reached New York, when he met an enterprising hatter; that gentleman remarked upon the ‘lived-in’ nature of Lincoln’s chapeau, and offered to trade him the old for a new one.