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Malcolm X

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  • Blavity

    Malcolm X: Photographs of the 1960s Activist and Leader by Eve Arnold http://life.time.com/history/eve-arnold-malcolm-x-and-the-nation-of-islam/# #blackpower #malcolmx

  • Lisa Hopkins

    Malcolm X (May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965), born Malcolm Little and also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Arabic), was an African-American minister and a human rights activist. To his admirers he was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans. He has been called one of the greatest and most influential African Americans in history.

  • Dan Splaine Photography

    Malcolm X, Chicago, 1961. made by the great Eve Arnold #portrait #photojournalism #photography

  • Utku Alp

    ''People don't realize how a man's whole life can be changed by one book.'' - Malcolm X

  • Bonnie

    Malcolm X by Eve Arnold / Magnum Photos

Related Pins

Eve Arnold // Malcolm X, Chicago // 1961

Ali and X - "Turning my back on Malcolm was one of the mistakes that I regret most in my life. I wish I’d been able to tell Malcolm I was sorry, that he was right about so many things. But he was killed before I got the chance. He was a visionary ahead of us all" - Muhammad Ali

When Malcolm X was in prison he went to the prison library and started seriously reading

If you're not careful, the media will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing. -Malcolm X

Maya Angelou with Malcolm X in Ghana, West Africa in 1964

Malcom X on a plane, 1963, Gordon Parks

John Elroy Sanford (better known as Redd Foxx), raised in Chicago and attended DuSable High School with Harold Washington. Foxx was also a childhood friend of Malcolm Little, who would later become Malcolm X.

This is a famous picture of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Both of these men were Civil Rights activists, and Malcolm X was assassinated in 1965 by Nation of Islam Members, because of their disagreement in his influential messages about Civil Rights.

Malcolm X & Mohammed Ali. "You're not supposed to be so blind with patriotism that you can't face reality. Wrong is wrong, no matter who says it."( X ) . . . "The fight is won or lost far away from witnesses – behind the lines, in the gym, and out there on the road, long before I dance under those lights." (Ali)