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Creatures of the Cork Forest

Cork Trees: Soft-Skinned Monarchs of the Mediterranean - via Smithsonian Magazine 28.06.2012 | ...The average specimen of Quercus suber produces about 100 pounds of cork in a stripping, while the very largest tree—named the Whistler Tree, 45 feet tall and a resident of Portugal’s Alentejo region—produced a ton of bark at its last harvest in 2009. It was enough for about 100,000 corks—enough to plug up the entire annual sweet wine production of Chateau d’Yquem... #Portugal

Alentejo cork trees - Portugal

Portugal. Cork harvesting, processing and use 60 years ago. www.takeportugal.com

Cork tree in Alentejo - PORTUGAL. The bright colour of the tree means that the cork (a kind of skin) was taken few months ago, the white number shows the year of the harvest (2012). First year that the tree is available to give a crop is 25 years after being planted, after that is every 9 years. Cork is a 100% sustainable material.

Cork - Alentejo, Portugal by ©miguel valle de figueiredo, via Flickr

The world’s largest cork tree is The Whistler Tree (so named because of the songbirds which occupy its huge canopy) and is located in the Alentejo region of Portugal. The tree is 230+ years old, and has been producing corks since 1820.

First Starlight Tourism Destination by UNESCO, UNWTO and IAC @ Mighty Lake Alqueva, Alentejo - PORTUGAL. There's a commodity in very short supply - light pollution - and in this rural area of Portugal, it's virtually unknown. The reserve also has a rich cultural heritage. Ancient megalithic structures suggest that even our ancestors valued the region for its celestial wealth. (Sky at Night Magazine / BBC) www.takeportugal.com