There’s more to see...
Come take a look at what else is here!
Welcome to Pinterest!
Join Pinterest to find all the things that inspire you.
Creating an account means you’re okay with Pinterest's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.
50+
billion Pins
to explore
15
seconds to
sign up (free!)
Visit site
  • Julie Duckworth

    Foundling tokens were pinned by mothers to their babys clothes and upon entry, the Hospital would attach them to the childs record of admission. As foundling babies were given new names, these tokens helped ensure correct identification, should a parent ever return to claim their child. The children were not allowed to keep their tokens, which were frequently everyday objects, such as a coin or button. The practice died out at the beginning of the nineteenth century.

  • Cathy Gladu

    Token left by a mother forced by poverty to give up her child to The Foundling Hospital. These were pinned by mothers to their baby’s clothes and upon entry, the Hospital would attach them to the child’s record of admission. As foundling babies were given new names, these tokens helped ensure correct identification, should a parent ever return to claim their child. The children were not allowed to keep their tokens, which were frequently everyday objects such as a coin or button.

Related Pins

:::::::::::: Antique Photograph :::::::::::: Beautiful picture of loving Mother and Child.

Indian Mother holding her Child. It was taken in 1908 by Edward S. Curtis. The image shows a Portrait of a Native American woman in a half-length, seated, facing right, position holding her baby in a beaded cradleboard.

What an artistically composed photo this is of a woman and daughter documenting their mourning. Really impactful photo.

What a beautiful way the child is looking at the woman.

Mother. you where the glue that held our family together. Now that you are gone we have fallen apart. I wish I knew your secret so that I could fix our broken hearts. We have lost our way and no one seems to care that once we where a family.

Is this post-mortem? The mother's hands offer no support to her child. Even the one behind her back is curled into a fist. The natural position would have been to open-handedly lend support, as well as the mother's loving touch. The only thing is that the mother's face looks very alive.

A Boy Not Yet Christened by Aria Nadii, via Flickr foundling museum london

(fiction) Amelia Grace (age 5) with mother, Lillie Mae Camden.

Amazing photo of child and mother. Looks as though they could be in mourning, second stage, but it is rare to see children all in black.