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Oh my! This #Athame is absolutely stunning! One day, I shall have a gorgeous athame for my very own! #pagan

Gorgeous craftmanship --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------(Viking Blog (copy/paste) elDrakkar.blogspo...)

The athame is the tool that is forceful and protective in nature and has the male aspect, it is the symbolic representative of fire.

Magick Ritual Sacred Tools: Crystal Athame, from Biddleboon's Magick Shop.

The New Leatherman OHT Until now, if you used a multi-tool, you had to choose between one-hand-opening pliers or one-hand-opening blades. Leatherman’s new OHT (One Hand Tool) fuses both together. The pliers snap out directly from the front of the tool where they lock in place and split the spring loaded handles until you slide the pliers (which include wire-cutters with replaceable blades) back in. Believe me, it looks and feels…well…badass. Additionally, the handles have visual imprint...

Miao Dao from Zhi Sword forge in Longquan China. Wooden training Chang Dao with purple-heart handle from Raven. New tools this autumn. .kwallbridge

Martial Arts
Kevin Wallbridge
Martial Arts

Dragonfly Sword The entire hilt of this sword forms the body of a detailed dragonfly. The wings spread out to form the hilt, the handle i...

Kirikashi:  Made from salvaged tool steel. 6 7/8th” overall, 4″ handle, 1 5/8th ” cutting edge.

Short Sword and Scabbard, 18th–19th century. Tibetan. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Bequest of George C. Stone, 1935 (36.25.1466a, b) #sword

SWORD (YATAGAN) WITH SCABBARD, 18th century. Turkish. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Collection of Giovanni P. Morosini, presented by his daughter, Giulia, 1932 (32.75.261a, b) #sword