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    During World War II, Josephine Baker served with the French Red Cross and was an active member of the French resistance movement. Using her career as a cover Baker became an intelligence agent, carrying secret messages written in invisible ink on her sheet music. She was awarded honor of the Croix de Guerre, and received a Medal of the Resistance in 1946.

    Josephine Baker was the first African American female to star in a motion picture, to integrate an American concert hall, and to become a world-famous entertainer. Not only was Josephine beautiful, but she brought incredible amounts of change to the US for African Americans. After growing up being abused by her white female employer, Josephine went to to live as a child of the streets, using street performances to support herself. She soon became the “highest paid chorus girl in vaudeville...

    The 89th Infantry Division in World War II was the first unit to actually come upon a Nazi concentration camp. The discovery of the Ohrdruf camp, by the 89th Infantry Division, is memorialized in the Holocaust Museum located in Washington, DC. Ohrdruf was a work camp, not an extermination camp, but the difference is difficult to discern. Prisoners were literally worked to death and disposed of by burning in incinerators, which was the most "cost-effective method". As the Allies approached,

    Mata Hari was a Dutch exotic dancer, courtesan, and accused spy who was executed by firing squad in France under charges of espionage for Germany during World War I. The idea of an exotic dancer working as a lethal double agent using her powers of seduction to extract military secrets from her many lovers made Mata Hari an enduring archetype of the femme fatale. Photo taken in 1906.

    WWII -- original caption: "Willa Beatrice Brown, a 31-year-old Negro American, serves her country by training pilots for the U.S. Army Air Forces. She is the first Negro woman to receive a commission as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Civil Air Patrol."

    josephine baker

    Harlem Hellfighters WWI One of the most distinguished units was the 369th Infantry Regiment, known as the “Harlem Hellfighters”, which was on the front lines for six months, longer than any other American unit in the war. 171 members of the 369th were awarded the Legion of Merit.

    Eartha!

    "Geraldine Hoff Doyle, was a 17 years (in 1942) while she was working at the American Broach & Machine Co. when a photographer snapped a pic of her on the job. That image used by J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War II."

    Women's Suffrage 1920

    Sergeant Stubby (1916 or 1917 – March 16, 1926), was the most decorated war dog of World War I and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat.

    June 20, 1943 "In Detroit, this very day marks the beginning of a violent, race-fueled riot that lasted for days and left dozens dead and countless others injured. Of the persons killed, 25 were African American and 17 of that group were struck down by police officers." newsone.com/...

    Eartha M.M. White and her mother Clara White, 1910. A former opera singer, Eartha helped create the first school for black children in the Bayard neighborhood of Jacksonville. Eartha lived frugally on a teacher's wages, so she could support philanthropic causes. In 1904, she founded the Clara White Mission to honor her mother, a former slave who ran a soup kitchen in her home. Founded to serve blacks in segregated Jacksonville, the Clara White Mission now serves people of all races.

    One of the many women who worked manufacturing the war machines that propelled Allied Forces to victory in World War II was Pauline Mauck. She was a real life “Rosie the Riveter” who worked in a Republic Aviation P-47 plant in Evansville, Iowa during WWII. She posed on the propeller of one of the planes coming out of the plant and it became an iconic image during the war.

    Minnie Brown, taken at White Studios, NY, 1907 From the link: “She was an actress and singer. And also a member of the Williams & Walker Vaudevillian troupe. In 1920 she served as vice president for the National Association of Negro Musicians.”

    Our Story: The Dahomey Amazons

    In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston marathon. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire marathon.The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines, and Kathrine later won the 1974 NYC marathon (women's division) with a time of 3:07:29.

    This is the first image of a Black suffragette I've found. Charlotte Brown, Nat King Cole married her daughter.

    World War II Eastern front - The sign reads: "We are partisans and have shot at German soldiers."