During World War II, Josephine Baker served with the French Red Cross and was an active member of the French resistance movement. Using her career as a cover Baker became an intelligence agent, carrying secret messages written in invisible ink on her sheet music. She was awarded honor of the Croix de Guerre, and received a Medal of the Resistance in 1946.

Josephine Baker was the first African American female to star in a motion picture, to integrate an American concert hall, and to become a world-famous entertainer. Not only was Josephine beautiful, but she brought incredible amounts of change to the US for African Americans. After growing up being abused by her white female employer, Josephine went to to live as a child of the streets, using street performances to support herself. She soon became the “highest paid chorus girl in vaudeville.....

Let's Stick to our Guns! #vintage #wwii

June 20, 1943 "In Detroit, this very day marks the beginning of a violent, race-fueled riot that lasted for days and left dozens dead and countless others injured. Of the persons killed, 25 were African American and 17 of that group were struck down by police officers." http://newsone.com/2605677/detroit-race-riot-1943/

"Geraldine Hoff Doyle, was a 17 years (in 1942) while she was working at the American Broach & Machine Co. when a photographer snapped a pic of her on the job. That image used by J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War II."

Olive Oatman, first tattooed white woman in the U.S. She received her tattoos after being abducted by Indians.

Col. Ed McMahon, USMC (Ret.), like many Hollywood celebrities of his era, was a military veteran. He volunteered for service during World War II. He went through flight training at various bases, but the end of the war came before he was deployed overseas. In the 1950s, McMahon was recalled by the Marines to serve in Korea. There, he was an F-9 Panther pilot and flew 85 combat missions as an artillery spotter, according to an Army website. 1923 - 2009

RG 306-NT-279 C-34 photograph of Amelia Earhart emerging from the bottom of the sea off Block Island, July 25, 1929

Minnie Brown, taken at White Studios, NY, 1907 From the link: “She was an actress and singer. And also a member of the Williams & Walker Vaudevillian troupe. In 1920 she served as vice president for the National Association of Negro Musicians.”

John Withers, World War II veteran risked a dishonorable discharge and the loss of his academic career in order to hide and save two dying Jewish teens he liberated from Dachau.

Ben Kuroki - flew a total of 58 combat missions during World War II, and is the only Japanese-American in the United States Army Air Forces to serve in combat operations in the Pacific theater of World War II.

Mata Hari was a Dutch exotic dancer, courtesan, and accused spy who was executed by firing squad in France under charges of espionage for Germany during World War I. The idea of an exotic dancer working as a lethal double agent using her powers of seduction to extract military secrets from her many lovers made Mata Hari an enduring archetype of the femme fatale. Photo taken in 1906.

Josephine Baker was a member of the French Resistance during World War II.

Soldiers goose-step past the Führer in honor of Hitler's 50th birthday, April 20, 1939. Less than five months later, on September 1, the Third Reich's forces invaded Poland; on September 3, England and France declared war on Germany. The Second World War had begun.

Lieutenant John F. Kennedy, USN, World War II. One of my favorite pictures of him.

Sergeant Stubby (1916 or 1917 – March 16, 1926), was the most decorated war dog of World War I and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat.

Kim Phuc was pictured in a world-famous and photograph from the Vietnam war, running naked from an airborne attack, horribly burned with napalm, in June of 1972. She now runs The Kim Foundation International, and she acts as a Goodwill Ambassador for UNESCO.

"In 1944, Mickey Rooney enlisted in the US Army. He served more than 21 months, until shortly after the end of World War II. During and after the war he helped entertain the troops and spent part of the time as a radio personality on the American Forces Network. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal, the Army Good Conduct Medal, American Campaign Medal, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, and World War II Victory Medal for his military service."

Give a share, America ♦ WWII Christmas poster promoting the purchase of war bonds and stamps,1941

Stewart, a Best Actor winner in 1941 for The Philadelphia Story, was one of the first major stars to enlist. During World War II, he'd fly at least 20 combat missions in Europe.