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    “Before our white brothers arrived to make us civilized men, we didn’t have any kind of prison. We had no locks, therefore there were no thieves. When someone was so poor he couldn’t afford a horse, tent or blanket, he would receive it all as a gift. We were in bad shape before white men arrived. I don’t know how to explain how we were able to manage without these fundamental things that (so they tell us) are so necessary for civilized society” - John (Fire) Lame Deer, Sioux Lakota, 1903-1976

    Why didn't I see this map in grade school?

    There is an ancient Indian saying~ Something lives only as long as the last person who remembers it. My people have come to trust memory over history. Memory, like fire, is radiant & immutable while history serves only those who seek to control it, those who douse the flame of memory in order to put out the dangerous fire of truth. Beware these men for they are dangerous & unwise. Their false history is written in the blood of those who might remember & seek the truth.~Floyd 'Red Crow' Westerman

    Red Cloud (Lakota: Maȟpíya Lúta) (1822 – December 10, 1909) was a war leader and a chief of the Oglala Lakota. He led as a chief from 1868 to 1909. One of the most capable Native American opponents the United States Army faced, he led a successful campaign in 1866–1868 known as Red Cloud's War over control of the Powder River Country in northeastern Wyoming and southern Montana.Red Cloud3.jpg

    Zitkala-Sa (Gertrude Bonnin), 1876-1938, granddaughter of Sitting Bull

    Tribes of Indian Nation - American Indian unit

    “They made us many promises, more than I can remember, but they kept only one; they promised to take our land, and they did.” Chief Red Cloud,  Oglala Lakota  (1822 – December 10, 1909)

    "The love of possessions is a disease with them. They take tithes from the poor and weak to support the rich who rule. They claim this mother of ours, the Earth, for their own and fence their neighbours away. If America had been twice the size it is, there still would not have been enough; the Indian would still have been dispossessed." - Sitting Bull (Hunkpapa Lakota First Nation)

    1915 Red Fox James, a Blackfoot Indian, rode horseback from state to state seeking approval for a day to honor Indians. On Dec. 14, 1915, he presented the endorsements of 24 state governments at the White House. There is no record, however, of such a national day being proclaimed. (Library of Congress)

    Tah It Way, Native American of the Calumet Tribe, photograhed by Edward Curtis in 1905. Tah It Way, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front, peace pipe on right.

    Buffalo Calf Road Woman (1850s-1878), was a Northern Cheyenne woman who saved her wounded warrior brother Chief Comes in Sight, in the Battle of Rosebud (as it was called by the US) in 1876. She fought next to her husband in the Battle of the Little Bighorn that same year. In 2005 Northern Cheyenne storytellers broke more than 100 years of silence about the battle, and they credited her with striking the blow that knocked General George Armstrong Custer off his horse before he died.

    Lakota Virtues

    Native American Award for Valor, Courage and Bravery Is there a Native American symbol awarded to great warriors for valor, courage, and bravery in battle much like the Silver or Bronze Stars awarded to soldiers.

    “I am a red man. If the Great Spirit had desired me to be a white man he would have made me so in the first place” - Sitting Bull

    picture of Indians in Winter Camp. The picture was taken in 1908, and shows some Apsaroke Indians.

    Sioux Chiefs

    this is jeanne calment, was anyway. she passed away in 1997 at the age of 122 years and 164 days old. she learned to fence at 85, and was still riding a bicycle at 100. at 113 she was known as the last living person to have personally met vincent van gogh! she lived alone until 110 and was able to walk upright until almost 115. lets all raise a glass for jeanne calment :) for living one of the longest lifetimes in documented history

    Sioux Native American Chief

    Hattie Tom, (Apache) 1899

    Black Hair, Native American, photographed by Edward Curtis in 1905. Black Hair, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front.

    Ms. Apolinaria Gutierrez Garrett, wife of famous frontier sheriff Pat Garrett, holding the gun he used in 1881 to kill Billy the Kid. Photo circa 1920.