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Circë and Scylla, from Greek mythology as retold by Ovid. Scylla, daughter of a river god, loved by Glaucus. Glaucus was also loved by the sorceress Circe. While Scylla was bathing in the sea, Circe poured a potion into the water which caused Scylla to transform into a monster with four eyes, six long necks equipped with grisly heads, each of which contained three rows of sharp teeth. Her body consisted of twelve tentacle-like legs and a cat’s tail while four to six dog-heads ringed her waist.

Head from the figure of a woman [Cycladic; Keros-Syros culture] (64.246) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Head of Diana , goddess of hunting and the moon , Delphi Museum

The giants of Greek mythology, or Gigantes ("the earth-born") as they are called in the Greek tongue, were a class of oversized and ofttimes monstrous men who were closely related to the gods. The most famous of these were the hundred Thracian Gigantes who waged war on the gods, but there were many others besides, including the handsome giant Orion, the one-eyed Polyphemus, and the six-armed Gegenees.

Torso of draped, flying Greek The Metropolitan Museum of Art Statuette of Nike (personification of victory), late 5th century B.C.; Classical Greek Terracotta Source: www.metmuseum.org...

Perseus with the head of Medusa

Sea monster illustration. Just what exactly lurks below the ocean's surface?

Bronze Diskos Thrower -- Circa 480–460 BCE -- Classical. Greek -- The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Scylla - By Anubish - Blue Scylla-Scylla and Charybdis were mythical sea monsters noted by Homer; later Greek tradition sited them on opposite sides of the Strait of Messina between Sicily and the Italian mainland. Scylla was described as a six-headed sea monster on the Italian side of the strait and Charybdis was a whirlpool off the coast of Sicily. They posed an inescapable threat to passing sailors; avoiding Charybdis meant passing too close to Scylla and vice versa.

Greek Mythology: Geras was the spirit (daimon) of old age, one of the malevolent spirits spawned by the goddess Nyx (Night). He was depicted as a tiny shrivelled up old man. Geras' opposite number was the goddess of youth, Hebe.

Unattributed Terracotta Neck-Amphora in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Oct. 2007 Back view. Terracotta neck-amphora Greek (Attic, Geometric), fourth quarter of the 8th century BC