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Circë and Scylla, from Greek mythology as retold by Ovid. Scylla, daughter of a river god, loved by Glaucus. Glaucus was also loved by the sorceress Circe. While Scylla was bathing in the sea, Circe poured a potion into the water which caused Scylla to transform into a monster with four eyes, six long necks equipped with grisly heads, each of which contained three rows of sharp teeth. Her body consisted of twelve tentacle-like legs and a cat’s tail while four to six dog-heads ringed her waist.

THE KHIMAIRA (or Chimera) was a monstrous beast which ravaged the countryside of Lykia in Anatolia. It was a composite creature, with the body and maned head of a lion, a goat's head rising from its back, a set of goat-udders, and a serpentine tail.

The giants of Greek mythology, or Gigantes ("the earth-born") as they are called in the Greek tongue, were a class of oversized and ofttimes monstrous men who were closely related to the gods. The most famous of these were the hundred Thracian Gigantes who waged war on the gods, but there were many others besides, including the handsome giant Orion, the one-eyed Polyphemus, and the six-armed Gegenees.

Hestia, goddess of the hearth | Greek vase, Athenian red figure kylix

Sea monster illustration. Just what exactly lurks below the ocean's surface?

Perseus with the head of Medusa

Greek Mythology: Geras was the spirit (daimon) of old age, one of the malevolent spirits spawned by the goddess Nyx (Night). He was depicted as a tiny shrivelled up old man. Geras' opposite number was the goddess of youth, Hebe.

Alkonost, a legendary creature from Slavian mythology, with a bird body, female head and breast.

In Greek mythology, Planē or Plane (Greek: Πλανε, pronounced "play-nee") was a Goddess and Personification of Error. Her name derived from the Greek term for 'wandering'

Sculpture "Andromeda and the Sea Monster" by Domenico Guidi, 1694, housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, N.Y.

Eidyia The Ocean Goddess In Greek mythology, Eidyia is an Oceanid, one of the three thousand daughters of the Titans, Oceanus and Tethys. Her name was derived from the Greek word eidô, "to see" or "know." In the familial sense she probably personified the magical power of the eye, which in Greek superstition was the source of the witch's supernatural power. Art and quote by Emily Balivet