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    A diagram of a cross-section of a muscle showing fibres. Credit: Miles Kelly Art Library, Wellcome Images.

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Artwork showing men exercising in the chambers of the heart, representing the link between exercise and a healthy heart. Credit: Oliver Burston, Wellcome Images.

A colour-enhanced scanning electron microscope image of red blood cells. Credit: David Gregory and Debbie Marshall, Wellcome Images.

A digitally enhanced image of a model human heart. Credit: Gordon Museum, Wellcome Images.

Artwork of the heart, its vessels and the lungs. This diagram illustrates the circulation of the blood from the right ventricle back to the left atrium, during which carbon dioxide is excreted and oxygen absorbed. Credit: Wellcome Images.

A colour-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of the inner surface of the lung, showing alveoli. Credit: David Gregory and Debbie Marshall, Wellcome Images.

A colour-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of an alveolus (plural: alveoli). Credit: David Gregory and Debbie Marshall, Wellcome Images.

An X-ray showing blood vessels inside a normal lung. Credit: Wellcome Photo Library, Wellcome Images.

Artwork of the lobes of both lungs, the trachea branching into the right and left bronchi, the smaller bronchioles and the air spaces containing the alveoli. Credit: Wellcome Images, Wellcome Images.

Artwork showing an anterior view of the larynx, thyroid, trachea and lungs with bronchial tree. Credit: Medical Art Service, Munich/Wellcome Images.

The skeleton of a man, aged 39 years, which had numerous osseous growths of varied dimensions. From the Hunterian specimen in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, no.1616a. Presented by Samuel George Shattock, Esq (1888-1889). Credit: St Bartholomew’s Hospital Archives and Museum, Wellcome Images.

Artwork of the figure of a woman running, revealing the skeleton beneath transparent skin. Credit: Oliver Burston, Wellcome Images.

A diagram showing a cross-section of the composition of bone. Credit: Miles Kelly Art Library, Wellcome Images.

The bones of the human fingers, wearing a ring. This image is a photograph of an X-ray attributed to L Ropner, 1897. Credit:Wellcome Library, London.

Compact bone, from human femur. Bone is made up of two types of tissue: the compact bone forms a shell around the spongy cancellous bone that makes up the marrow space in the centre. Compact bone provides strength and rigidity and is solid in appearance. It is composed of a layered matrix of organic substances and inorganic salts that form around an intricate network of vasculature called Haversian canals. Credit: Ivor Mason, KCL, Wellcome Images.

The ‘epiphysis’ is the rounded end of a long bone - the region of bone that forms joints with adjacent bones. The process seen here is ossification, the growth process that results in the generation of new bone. Calcification occurs during ossification. Credit: Spike Walker, Wellcome Images.

A region of growth (epiphyseal growth plate) in an immature thighbone. Cartilage is stained purple, and bone is stained yellow-green. The rapidly dividing cartilage cells within the purple band at the top form stacks that run parallel to the long axis of the bone. Below this zone, the cartilage becomes calcified and the cartilage cells (chondrocytes) die. Further down is the ossification zone, where the bone tissue is laid down. Credit: Karin Hing, Wellcome Images.

A thin slice of an osteoporotic vertebra (a bone of the spine) from an 89-year-old woman, showing damage to the structure of the bone. This image has been colour enhanced. Credit: Professor Alan Boyde, Wellcome Images.

A scanning electron micrograph of osteoporotic bone. This sample is from a vertebra (a bone of the spine) of an 89-year-old woman with osteoporosis. Credit: Professor Alan Boyde, Wellcome Images.

A scanning electron micrograph of normal bone. This sample is from a vertebra (a bone of the spine) of a healthy male. Credit: Professor Alan Boyde, Wellcome Images.

The skeleton of a human male in a sitting position. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

A confocal image showing damaged collagen fibres in a ruptured tendon. The area of wavy fibres to the lower right shows the normal, healthy appearance of tendon. The waviness allows the whole tendon to have a small amount of elasticity (between 2 and 10 per cent): the collagen fibres themselves do not stretch. Credit: Martin Knight, Wellcome Images.

A diagram of a cross-section of a muscle showing fibres. Credit: Miles Kelly Art Library, Wellcome Images.

Galvani’s experiments on the sciatic nerve of frogs. This was the first detection of galvanic currents. From ‘Memorie sulla elettricita animale’ by Luigi Galvani (1797, Bologna). Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

A transmission electron micrograph showing glycogen storage in a muscle cell. Some glycogen granules are dispersed around the many mitochondria in between the contractile myofibrils, but most of the glycogen is in a large area on the edge of the cell. Credit: Mike Kayser, Wellcome Images.

A light micrograph of stained longitudinal section through striated muscle. Credit: Spike Walker, Wellcome Images.