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Oh. My. Gods. by Tera Lynn Childs (YA Fiction). When her mother suddenly decides to marry a near-stranger, Phoebe, whose passion is running, soon finds herself living on a remote Greek island, completing her senior year at an ancient high school where the students and teachers are all descended from gods or goddesses.

Phoebe, who recently discovered she's a descendant of Nike (the goddess, not the shoe), is finding that supernatural powers come with a crazy learning curve. Her stepfather, headmaster of the Academy for descendants of the Greek gods, has enrolled her at Dynamotheos Development Camp aka Goddess Boot Camp with a bunch of ten-year-olds for the summer. Embarrassing as that is, hopefully it'll help her gain control over her powers in time to pass the test of the gods, continue training hard

Oh My Gods: A Modern Retelling of Greek and Roman Myths, by Philip Freeman (Non-Fiction). A professor of classics and visiting scholar at the Harvard Divinity school presents modern interpretations of traditional Greek and Roman myths that render classic themes accessible to a new generation of readers.

It's always been just Kate and her mom-and her mother is dying. Her last wish? To move back to her childhood home. So Kate's going to start at a new school with no friends, no other family and the fear her mother won't live past the fall. Then she meets Henry. Dark. Tortured. And mesmerizing. He claims to be Hades, god of the Underworld-and if she accepts his bargain, he'll keep her mother alive while Kate tries to pass seven tests. Kate is sure he's crazy-until she sees him ....

How do you defy destiny? Helen Hamilton has spent her entire sixteen years trying to hide how different she is--no easy task on. And it's getting harder. Nightmares of a desperate desert journey have Helen waking parched, only to find her sheets damaged by dirt and dust. At school she's haunted by hallucinations of three women weeping tears of blood . . .

She is beautiful, a princess, and Aphrodite is her favorite goddess, but something in Helen of Sparta just itches for more out of life. Not one to count on the gods--or her looks--to take care of her, Helen sets out to get what she wants with steely determination and a sassy attitude. That same attitude makes Helen a few enemies--such as the self-proclaimed "son of Zeus" Theseus. Friesner deftly weaves together history and myth as she takes a new look at the girl who will become Helen of…