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  • My Self

    Margaret of Anjou (c.1429-82), wife of Lancastrian Henry VI. When Henry was deemed mentally incompetent, Margaret restyled herself a warrior-queen. She led several victories during the War of the Roses. Her only child was slain in battle by Edward VI. The most famous portrait of her from her lifetime is this one from the manuscript presented to Margaret upon her marriage by John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury.

  • Linda Jenkins

    Margaret of Anjou, the powerful, determined wife of the hapless Henry VI. She was the defacto leader of the House of Lancaster during the Wars of the Roses, fighting tooth and claw for the rights of her son, Edward. Her armies won some battles and lost others. When Edward was killed at the battle of Tewkesbury in 1471, Margaret no longer had anything to fight for. She later went back to France and died in obscurity. In her prime, a very formidable woman.

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Margaret of Anjou, wife of Henry VI and Queen Consort. ca. XV.

Detail of a herald in a tabard of the arms of John Talbot, earl of Shrewsbury, with the arms of his wife, Margaret Beauchamp, in pretence, holding a flagpole. Origin:France, N. (Rouen) Attribution:Talbot Master British Library Collection

Henry Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; nephew of William and Catherine Parr, 6th wife of Henry VIII; his unconsummated marriage to Katherine Grey (sister of Jane) was annulled when the Grey family fortunes declined.

Anne St. John, Daughter of Anne Leighton, Great-Great Granddaughter of Mary Boleyn. Anne St. John was born on November 5, 1614, the second child and eldest daughter of Sir John St John and his wife Anne Leighton.

Fighting women of the Fon (Dahomey people) and their neighbors the Ashanti. Originally retained as an elite royal guard, Dahomey amazons held semi-sacred status as celibate warrior "wives" of the King. They prided themselves on their hardened physiques and highly-trained martial skills, and constantly strove to outperform their male counterparts. By 1890 they were more than 30 percent of the Dahomey fighting force.

Edward IV. As shrewd a monarch as you could want.

King Henry VI (1422 - 1461) son of Henry V. He assumed royal power 1442 and sided with the party opposed to the continuation of the Hundred Years' War with France. After his marriage 1445, he was dominated by his wife, Margaret of Anjou. He was deposed 1461 in the Wars of the Roses; was captured 1465, temporarily restored 1470, but again imprisoned 1471 and then murdered. Henry was eight months old when he succeeded to the English throne.

Amarna Kiya canope, KV 55, Egyptian Museum. Kiya was a second wife to Akhenaten and not much is known about her. Her rival was the chief queen Nefertiti.

The Bust of Nefertiti - the bust was discovered by a local workman attached to the team of German archaeologist, Ludwig Borchardt on the afternoon of the 6th December 1912, while they were excavating the remains of the deserted ancient city of Amarna, once the capital of the so called heretic Pharaoh Akhenaten and his Queen, Nefertiti.

TUDOR ROSE-- Catherine DeRoet Swynford; mistress and eventual 3rd wife of John of Gaunt (son of Edward III); Duchess of Lancaster and ancestress of the Tudor line via their children, the Beauforts

Berengaria of Navarre c. 1165–1170 – 23 December 1230) was Queen of the English as the wife of King Richard I of England. She was the eldest daughter of King Sancho VI of Navarre and Sancha of Castile. As is the case with many of the medieval queens consort of the Kingdom of England, relatively little is known of her life. The early 20th Century Cunard passenger liner RMS Berengaria was named in her honour, the first Cunard ship to be named for a British queen.

She was Nero's second wife, first half of first century AD POPPAEA SABINA.