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Adah Belle Samuels Thoms (January 12, 1870 – February 21, 1943) was an African American nurse who fought for African Americans to serve as army nurses during World War I. She was among the first nurses inducted into the American Nurses Association Hall of Fame when it was established in 1976

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1001 Things Everyone Should Know About African American History

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Kate Richards O'Hara (LOC) "Carrie Katherine "Kate" Richards O'Hare (1877–1948) was an American Socialist Party activist, editor, and orator best known for her controversial imprisonment during World War I." [between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920]

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Lucy Laney 1854-1933, founded the first kindergarten for black children in Augusta; the first Nurses' Training Institute for black females; organized the first black high-school football in Georgia; and developed a curriculum that combined arts and sciences with job-training and vocational programs. Among her students was Mary Mcleod Bethune who would one day found her own school and eventually become an advisor to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

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from BuzzFeed

The 50 Most Powerful Pictures In American History

An American sailor passionately kisses a nurse as thousands jam into Times Square to celebrate the long-awaited victory over Japan in World War II.

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Florence Jaffray "Daisy" Harriman (July 21, 1870 – August 31, 1967) was an American socialite, suffragist, social reformer, organizer, and later, a courageous diplomat. “She led one of the suffrage parades down Fifth Avenue, worked on campaigns on child labor and safe milk and, as minister to Norway in World War II, organized evacuation efforts while hiding in a forest from the Nazi invasion.” In her 92nd year, President John F. Kennedy awarded her a Citation of Merit for Distinguished…

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20 years ago, Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee, sister of Diana Ross of The Supremes, became the first African American to be appointed dean of a predominantly white medical school in the United States. In 1993, Ross-Lee became the first African American woman dean of a United States medical school. She remained dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine of Ohio University until 2001.

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Mary Jane McLeod Bethune (July 10, 1875 – May 18, 1955) was an American educator and civil rights leader best known for starting a school for African American students in Daytona Beach, Florida, that eventually became Bethune-Cookman University and for being an advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

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from BuzzFeed

The 50 Most Powerful Pictures In American History

In this 1955 picture, Rosa Parks is seen in her Montgomery county mugshot after being arrested for refusing to give up her seat on a public bus to a white passenger. The actions of Rosa Parks and the subsequent Montgomery Bus Boycott became important symbols of the Civil Rights Movement during the mid-20th century.

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Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), reformer of English nursing, received the Order of Merit for her tireless efforts during the Crimean War. She was the first female recipient of this honor. She is celebrated as an English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modern nursing.

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