Explore these ideas and more!

熊本
い

Japanese Gardens

Roses, Good Night

鬼瓦。。。何となく印象的で。

鬼瓦。。。何となく印象的で。

鬼瓦

Green Man, Statue, Temples, Castles, Environment, Chinese, Handicraft, Paisajes, Chateaus

合? のやつ 蒲原

合? のやつ 蒲原

特注の表札が完成しました。 鬼面鬼瓦付きの立派な表札です。10㎝程の小さな鬼瓦ですけど、 型抜きではなく、手作りしました。小さくても迫力のある鬼瓦になりました。 表札として、お客さまを迎えつつ、魔除けも兼ねていますので良い事しかないはず!?です。多分。 ありがとうございました。

特注の表札が完成しました。 鬼面鬼瓦付きの立派な表札です。10㎝程の小さな鬼瓦ですけど、 型抜きではなく、手作りしました。小さくても迫力のある鬼瓦になりました。 表札として、お客さまを迎えつつ、魔除けも兼ねていますので良い事しかないはず!?です。多分。 ありがとうございました。

πタイプのもう少し複雑なやつ 蒲原

πタイプのもう少し複雑なやつ 蒲原

Oni-gawara

Onigawara on Roof of Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music.

熊本
The name “onigawara” means literally “demon tiles” because the early end tiles were traditionally molded in the shape of a demon’s head or face, much like a clay gargoyle with the same function, i.e., to ward off evil. Onigawara developed around the middle of the Edo period when the tile roofs became popular for houses, and they reflected the status of the family. These highly decorative and unusual Japanese architectural elements are very popular in Japan.

The name “onigawara” means literally “demon tiles” because the early end tiles were traditionally molded in the shape of a demon’s head or face, much like a clay gargoyle with the same function, i.e., to ward off evil. Onigawara developed around the middle of the Edo period when the tile roofs became popular for houses, and they reflected the status of the family. These highly decorative and unusual Japanese architectural elements are very popular in Japan.

Roof Tile Oni-gawara (鬼瓦) Artist/maker unknown, Japanese Made in Japan, Edo Period (1615-1868) 19th century Earthenware Philadelphia Museum of Art

Nineteenth-century Japanese oni-gawara/devil tile for positioning on the roof of a traditional Japanese house; a protective symbol, the clouds and waves below it additionally warding against fire. (Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Pinterest
Search