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The most complete pre-human skull fossil ever found, a 1.8-million-year-old specimen, has been unearthed in rural Dmanisi, Georgia. The skull fossil is special not only in that it places the early hominid exodus out of Africa about 800,000 years earlier than previously thought, but also because it suggests that Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis and Homo erectus are in fact all part of a single evolving lineage that eventually led to modern humans.

HOMO ERGASTER (Wikipedia.org) 'The Working Man' (aka African Homo erectus) is a chronospecies of Homo that lived in eastern and southern Africa during the early Pleistocene, between 1.8 million and 1.3 million years ago.

Homo erectus ("upright man") is an extinct species of hominid that lived about 1.3 to 1.8 million years ago. The species originated in Africa and spread as far as India, China and Java. It is debated that it may be identical to Homo ergaster, which is commonly accepted as the direct ancestor of modern humans.

Homo habilis, ( Latin: “able man” or “handy man”) extinct species of human, the most ancient representative of the human genus, Homo. H. habilis inhabited parts of sub-Saharan Africa from perhaps 2 to 1.5 million years ago (mya). In 1959 and 1960 the first fossils were discovered at Olduvai Gorge in northern Tanzania. This discovery was a turning point in the science of paleoanthropology because the oldest previously known human fossils were Asian specimens of Homo erectus. Many features of H. h

After eight years spent studying a 1.8-million-year-old skull uncovered in the Republic of Georgia, scientists have made a discovery that may rewrite the evolutionary history of our human genus Homo. It would be a simpler story with fewer ancestral species. Early, diverse fossils — those currently recognized as coming from distinct species like Homo habilis, Homo erectus and others — may actually represent variation among members of a single, evolving lineage.

Homo habilis fossil skull. These predate homo erectus, living between 1.4 to 2.4 million years ago. Note that the teeth are not like modern apes and monkeys but like modern humans instead, giving more evidence (i.e. on top of bipedalism) that this was a human ancestor and not an early ape.

Homo habilis is a species of the genus Homo, which lived from approximately 2.33 to 1.4 million years ago, during the Gelasian Pleistocene period. The discovery and description of this species is credited to both Mary and Louis Leakey, who found fossils in Tanzania, East Africa, between 1962 and 1964. Homo habilis (or possibly H. rudolfensis) was the earliest known species of the genus Homo until May 2010, when H. gautengensis was discovered, a species believed to be even older than H. habilis

8 Incredible Facts You May Not Know About Human Evolution - Early human beings left Africa over 1 million years ago

In light of last week's announcement of the Dmanisi skull—and the possibility that all early Homo fossils were part of one species—some researchers posit that our early hominin ancestor, Homo erectus, might have been more like baboons than chimpanzees.

In light of last week's announcement of the Dmanisi skull—and the possibility that all early Homo fossils were part of one species—some researchers posit that our early hominin ancestor, Homo erectus, might have been more like baboons than chimpanzees. www.archaeology.o...

Homo ergaster (African Homo erectus): an extinct chronospecies of Homo that lived in eastern and southern Africa during early Pleistocene, between 1.8 and 1.3 million years ago; widely accepted to be the direct ancestor of later hominids

Humans (Homo sapiens) are primates of the family Hominidae and the only living species of the genus Homo. They originated in Africa where they reached anatomical modernity about 200,000 years ago and began to exhibit full behavioral modernity around 50,000 years ago.