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Broch of Mousa, Shetland Islands The construction of Alban “brochs” as early as 100 BC and all the other substantial archeological data available such as Cladh Chiaran in Ardnamurchan, Skara Brae in Orkney, Bosta House in Lewis and Machrie Moor Stone Circle in Arran, clearly show a society no less advanced and considerably more successful against the Romans than the Britons were. Brochs were round stone towers with an internal diameter of between twenty-five and forty feet.

Scattered all over Dwirion are ancient, simple towers, relics of the so-called Eldren, the first peoples of the Two Kingdoms.

This is a broch, a fortified home built during the Iron Age, some 2,100 years ago. Brochs, unique to Scotland, are dry-stone, twin-walled, round towers up to 30m across and 15m high. Part of a reproduction broch was built at Strathyre, Scotland by the West of Scotland Dry Walling Association using only tools used around 2000 years ago: A team of 20 spent five days constructing a 5m high section of the Dun Lubnaig Broch. Click through for details.

Carloway Broch, zlomený zub na čelisti ostrova Lewis

Mousa Broch, Shetland, Scotland by duncan, via Flickr -  It is the tallest still standing in the world and amongst the best-preserved prehistoric buildings in Europe. It is thought to have been constructed circa 100 BC, one of 570 brochs built throughout Scotland. The site is managed by Historic Scotland.

Mousa Broch, Shetland, Scotland by. It is the tallest still standing in the world and amongst the best-preserved prehistoric buildings in Europe. It is thought to have been constructed circa 100 BC, one of 570 brochs built throughout Scotland.

In the central part of Hoy Island is located mysterious monument of the past - Dwarfie Stane - enormous sandstone slab left by glacier.    Some 5,000 years ago people with unknown methods and unclear purpose hollowed out this stone, creating a passage with two side chambers. Passage was plugged with a 1.5 tons heavy stone plug - door.

Dwarfie Stane, Orkney Islands in Scotland. No one knows how and why the prehistoric people made this fantastic cut in live stone - but they did it! Seems, this was done some 5 - 6 thousand years ago.

This is what happens when the production crew lets me have the car and some time to myself. Aberlemno, Scotland, near Forfar, inland from Carnoustie. Pictish ruins right by the country highway, down the street from a grade school. This stone likely 8th century A.D. (And it was a stick, right-side drive. So there.)

There are two Class I Pictish Symbol stones (rough rocks, incised symbols) at Aberlemno. The best known is the fine Serpent Stone, so-called because of the serpent symbol at the top.

Carloway Broch, Lewis

This is Carloway Broch, on the Island of Lewis in Scotland looking something like a broken tooth on the jaw of the island. Its a fortified home built during the Iron Age some years ago. Much of the stone from the broch will have been used by locals

The centre of administration of the Pictish kingdom in the 9th century was Forteviot on the River Earn. Close by the Dunkeld, King Kenneth MacAlpin (Cináed mac Ailpín) set up a new religious centre about 850AD. This was an acknowledgement of the fact that Iona was now no longer tenable as a religious capital, although the monastery was eventually re-established and it remained the burial place of Pictish kings until the time of Donald Ban.

Forteviot, Cinead moved relics here and set this up at a religious and administrative centre

Camac, Brittany

alignements-de-Kermario - The Carnac stones are an exceptionally dense collection of megalithic sites around the French village of Carnac, in Brittany, consisting of alignments, dolmens, tumuli and single menhirs.

James Cope - Neolithic House an Art imagination of their homes. Neolithic Period was roughly 3500BC-2500BC.

James Cope - Neolithic House an Art imagination of their homes. Neolithic Period was roughly

Oldest Buildings In The World: Knap of Howar, Scotland (source: wiki)

10 Oldest Buildings In The World

Knap of Howar, Orkney, 3700 BC: These two oblong stone buildings – a dwelling and a workspace – are perhaps the oldest still-standing houses in northwest Europe. They were occupied for around 500 years, until

Broch of Mousa. The finest preserved example of a broch, or round tower, in Shetland, Scotland. It is the tallest still standing in the world and amongst the best-preserved prehistoric buildings in Europe. It is thought to have been constructed circa 100

Broch of Mousa - the finest preserved example of a broch or round tower in Shetland, Scotland. It is the tallest still standing in the world and amongst the best-preserved prehistoric buildings in Europe. It is thought to have been constructed circa 100 BC, one of 570 brochs built throughout Scotland. The site is managed by Historic Scotland.
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