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    File:Sans-culotte.jpg

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    • gabrielle alvarado

      A sans-culotte, or French revolutionary of the working class, he is wearing a carmagnole (short woolen or cloth jacket, dark color), trousers wooden shoes called clogs or sabot.

    • La Classe De CM2

      Homme sans culotte. Ils faisaient partie du tiers etat lors de la revolution. Peinture de Leopold Boilly (1761–1845)

    • Elpie

      Sans-culotte de Louis-Léopold Boilly, 1792. This portrait of the actor Chenard in sans-cullote (without breeches) shows the most radical revolutionary men's costume.

    • Yesenia Enriquez

      sans-culottes refers to their lower class status; culottes were the fashionable silk knee-breeches of the nobility and bourgeoisie, as distinguished from the working class sans-culottes, who traditionally wore pantalons, or trousers, instead.

    • Monika Pawlic

      The term sans culottes is French for ‘without britches.' Initially described a young man who wore long trousers known as Pantaloons. This term was to describe men part of the revolution especially the middle and lower classes.

    • Anna-Marie Hooper

      Sans culottes were working-class men who supported the French Revolution. The noblemen of the time wore knee breeches so the sans culottes wore these loose-fitting trousers. Sans culotte means "without knee breeches".

    • Jana Perskie

      "The Singer Chenard as a Sans-Culotte" by Boilly. In the French Revolution, the sans-culottes were the radical left-wing partisans of the lower classes-typically urban laborers, which dominated France. Though ill-clad and ill-equipped, they made up the bulk of the Rev. army during the early years of the French fashionable culottes (silk knee-breeches) of the moderate bourgeois revolutionaries, as opposed to the working classes, who wore trousers.

    • Vince Falcone

      "Retrat a sans-culotte" (Louis-Leopold Boilly)

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