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In 1943, Dr. Martha Euphemia Lofton Haynes graduated from The Catholic University in Washington D.C. and became the first black woman to earn a Ph.D. in Mathematics. She established a math department at Miner Teachers College – later the District of Columbia Teachers College – and served as Chair of the Division of Mathematics and #Education. In '66, she was the first woman to chair the District of Columbia School Board, where she was instrumental in integrating the DC public school system.

In 1943, Dr. Martha Euphemia Lofton Haynes graduated from The Catholic University in Washington D.C. and became the first black woman to earn a Ph.D. in Mathematics. She established a math department at Miner Teachers College – later the District of Columbia Teachers College – and served as Chair of the Division of Mathematics and #Education. In '66, she was the first woman to chair the District of Columbia School Board, where she was instrumental in integrating the DC public school system.

"Dr. Georgia Dwelle, the first Spelman College alumna to attend medical school, established the Dwelle Infirmary in 1920 in Atlanta. It was Georgia's first general hospital for African Americans, and its first obstetrical hospital for African American women. The infirmary, which also featured a pediatric clinic, was Georgia's first venereal disease clinic for African Americans, and offered Atlanta's first "Mother's Club" for African American women.

"Dr. Georgia Dwelle, the first Spelman College alumna to attend medical school, established the Dwelle Infirmary in 1920 in Atlanta. It was Georgia's first general hospital for African Americans, and its first obstetrical hospital for African American women. The infirmary, which also featured a pediatric clinic, was Georgia's first venereal disease clinic for African Americans, and offered Atlanta's first "Mother's Club" for African American women.

Lucy Ann Stanton, the first African-American woman to get a four year college degree. She graduated in 1850

Lucy Ann Stanton, the first African-American woman to get a four year college degree. She graduated in 1850

"Jane M. Bolin was the first Black woman graduate of Yale Law School and the first Black woman in the United States to become a judge. She is pictured here in July 1939, shortly after her appointment by New York City mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia, which made news all over the world. Judge Bolin retired in 1979 after 40 years as a judge - but only because she had reached the mandatory retirement age of 70. She died at age 98 in 2007."

"Jane M. Bolin was the first Black woman graduate of Yale Law School and the first Black woman in the United States to become a judge. She is pictured here in July 1939, shortly after her appointment by New York City mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia, which made news all over the world. Judge Bolin retired in 1979 after 40 years as a judge - but only because she had reached the mandatory retirement age of 70. She died at age 98 in 2007."

Vivien Thomas, cardiac surgery pioneer, 1940's, http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0386792/?ref_=nv_sr_1 . OP: Saw the movie about this guy. Really good. It was Severus Snape and Mos Def fighting hate by fixing hearts. Good watch.

Vivien Thomas, cardiac surgery pioneer. 1940's.

Vivien Thomas, cardiac surgery pioneer, 1940's, http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0386792/?ref_=nv_sr_1 . OP: Saw the movie about this guy. Really good. It was Severus Snape and Mos Def fighting hate by fixing hearts. Good watch.

Marjorie Lee Browne - one of the first African American women to receive a Doctorate in mathematics.  Alma mater - University of Michigan

Marjorie Lee Browne - one of the first African American women to receive a Doctorate in mathematics. Alma mater - University of Michigan

Shirley Ann Jackson PH.D is the second African American woman to earn her PH.D in Physics and and the first to earn it at MIT

Shirley Ann Jackson PH.D is the second African American woman to earn her PH.D in Physics and and the first to earn it at MIT

. #BHM2013: Zeta Phi Beta Soror Ethelyn Taylor Chisum was a renowned Dallas educator and school counselor. Along with her membership in Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, she was also a member of the Priscilla Art Club, which was the oldest club for African American women in Dallas.

. #BHM2013: Zeta Phi Beta Soror Ethelyn Taylor Chisum was a renowned Dallas educator and school counselor. Along with her membership in Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, she was also a member of the Priscilla Art Club, which was the oldest club for African American women in Dallas.

Today in Black History, 8/16/2013 - Charles Lewis Reason was appointed professor of fine writing, Greek, Latin, and French and adjunct professor of mathematics at New York Central College in 1849, becoming the first African American professor at a predominantly white college. For more info, check out today's notes!

Today in Black History, 8/16/2013 - Charles Lewis Reason was appointed professor of fine writing, Greek, Latin, and French and adjunct professor of mathematics at New York Central College in 1849, becoming the first African American professor at a predominantly white college. For more info, check out today's notes!

I am at once a physician, a citizen and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow this concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged and the planned have the right to live. - Dr. Mildred Jefferson (1926-2010) The first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School

I am at once a physician, a citizen and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow this concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged and the planned have the right to live. - Dr. Mildred Jefferson (1926-2010) The first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School

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