Discover and save creative ideas

    The Earliest Known Dictionaries Circa 2,300 BCE

    3y
    3y Saved to History

    9 comments

    • Luisa Reiche

      The Urra=hubullu, currently preserved at the Louvre Museum in Paris. (View Larger) The Urra=hubullu, currently preserved at the Louvre Museum in Paris. The oldest known dictionaries are cuneiform tablets from the Akkadian empireOffsite Link with biliingual wordlists in SumerianOffsite Link and AkkadianOffsite Link discovered in EblaOffsite Link in modern Syria.

    • Lisa Lunce

      ANCIENT DICTIONARY (earliest known dictionary, dates from 2,300 BC, written in cuneiform tablets, currently housed at the Louvre in Paris, France)

    • Nancy Shogren

      Ebla. The oldest known dictionaries are cuneiform tablets from the Akkadian empire w/ bilingual word lists in Sumerian & Akkadian. The Urra=hubullu glossary, a major Babylonian glossary or encyclopedia from the 2nd mill. BC, is an outstanding example of this early form of wordlist. Syria. Louvre

    • Jenny Baker

      "The oldest known dictionaries are cuneiform tablets from the Akkadian empire with bilingual word lists in Sumerian and Akkadian discovered in Ebla in modern Syria. The Urra=hubullu glossary, a major Babylonian glossary or encyclopedia from the second millennium BCE, preserved in the Louvre, is an outstanding example of this early form of wordlist."

    • Sheila Russell Thurber

      The Earliest Known Dictionaries -- (Circa 2,300 BCE) -- The oldest known dictionaries are cuneiform tablets from the Akkadian empire with biliingual wordlists in Sumerian and Akkadian discovered in Ebla in modern Syria. The Urra=hubullu, currently preserved at the Louvre Museum in Paris. - historyofinformation.com

    • Crossing the Sea

      The Urra=hubullu, currently preserved at the Louvre Museum in Paris. The oldest known dictionaries are cuneiform tablets from the Akkadian empireOffsite Link with biliingual wordlists in SumerianOffsite Link and AkkadianOffsite Link discovered in EblaOffsite Link in modern Syria.

    • Melanie Jenkins

      The Urra=hubullu glossary, a major Babylonian glossary or encyclopedia from the 2nd millennium BCE, is an outstanding example of this early form of wordlist. It is currently preserved at the Louvre Museum in Paris. (View Larger)

    • Lennart Björneborn

      The earliest known dictionaries, circa 2300 BC, cuneiform tablets from the Akkadian empire with bilingual wordlists in Sumerian and Akkadian discovered in Ebla in modern Syria. Source: http://www.historyofinformation.com/expanded.php?id=2456

    • Paola Ramirez

      Book History Timeline Outline by Jeremy Norman. From cave paintings to the internet

    People also love

    The Rosetta Stone has the same inscription written in three languages; Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, Demotic, and Greek. Its discovery in 1799 was key to figuring out the hieroglyphic writing system, thus allowing modern historians to unlock the contents of many manuscripts and carvings that were previously unknown. The Rosetta Stone is currently located in the British Museum.

    Instructions of Shuruppak dating back to 3,000 BC. This is one of the oldest known works of literature in human history. The Instructions contain precepts that reflect those later included in the Ten Commandments and other sayings that are reflected in the biblical Book of Proverbs. Translation here: etcsl.orinst.ox.a...

    Babylonian grammatical text stone tablet used in the research and assembly of a 21-volume dictionary of the language of ancient Mesopotamia and its Babylonian and Assyrian dialects. Unspoken for 2,000 years but preserved on clay tablets and in stone inscriptions deciphered over the last two centuries. Dictionary finally completed by scholars at the University of Chicago.

    Sumerian Star Chart. Sky Map of Ancient Nineveh. c.3300 BCE. Reproduction of a Sumerian star map or “planisphere” recovered in the late 19th century from the 650 BCE underground library of Ashurbanipal. Long thought to be an Assyrian tablet, computer analysis has matched it with the sky above Mesopotamia in 3300BC and proves it to be more ancient Sumerian origin. The tablet is an “Astrolabe”, the earliest known astronomical instrument.

    Astrolabe, magnificent computer of the Ancients—an instrument used to make astronomical measurements, before the development of the sextant

    Baltic Sea Anomaly ~ A company that locates and finds sunken ships recently turned up an unusual circular or oval formation in the Baltic Sea off the coast of Sweden on June 19, 2011. This HUGE object is still being investigated, but the resemblance to Han Solo’s Millennium Falcon has made the object a hot topic on UFO and paranormal web sites. The fact that it seems to be composed of natural minerals raises the odds of it being some kind of a natural rock formation.

    Sumerian StarGate

    A set of 70 books were found about 5 years ago in Jordan."Initial metallurgical tests indicate that some of the books could date from the first century AD. This estimate is based on the form of corrosion which has taken place, which experts believe would be impossible to achieve artificially."

    tiny old book - Initial metallurgical tests indicate that some of the books could date from the first century AD.

    “A team of physicists detected an energy beam coming through the top of the Bosnian Pyramid of the Sun. The radius of the beam is 4.5 meters with a frequency of 28 kHz. The beam is continuous and its strength grows as it moves up and away from the pyramid. This phenomenon contradicts the known laws of physics and technology.

    The heads on Easter Island have bodies; cool archaeological discovery in 2012

    19th-century pregnant dolls, Fetus model set (circa 1877) via Toyota Collection

    Redheaded mummy from Sungir, Russia found in houses constructed out of mammoth bones and hide. Southern Russia, between 30,000 and 20,000 BC.

    Sumerian depiction of an Annunaki (Sumerian god) Warrior.

    Iron Age shoes (ca. 400 BCE to 400 CE) found on body found in European bog

    Ashurnasirpal II Assyrian King 883 BC

    Gebel el-Arak Knife. 3300-3200 BCE. The Gebel el-Arak Knife is an ivory and flint knife dating from the Naqada II d period of Egyptian prehistory, starting circa 3450 BC. The knife was purchased in 1914 in Cairo by Georges Aaron Bénédite for the Louvre.

    Neo-Assyrian ivory plaque with ram-headed sphinx, ca 9th-8th cent. BCE Mesopotamia-Nimrud

    Nefertiti

    Oldest Known Footprint -- Kenya -- 1.5 Million Years Ago